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Insulin resistance and adipokines serum levels in a caucasian cohort of hiv-positive patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy: a cross sectional study.
BMC Endocr Disord 2013; 13:4BE

Abstract

METHODS

A cross-sectional study was conducted in an unselected sample of 89 HIV-1-positive, non-diabetic patients undergoing stable cART for at least 6 months. Metabolic parameters were measured, including fasting plasma insulin, and circulating adiponectin, leptin, resistin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. Insulin resistance was estimated by measuring the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI), using a cut-off value of 0.33. A linear regression model was fitted to QUICKI to test the association of IR and adipokines levels.

RESULTS

A total of 89 patients (aged 18-65, median: 28 years) including 51 men (57.3%) and 38 women (42.7%) were included in the study. Fifty nine patients (66.3%) were diagnosed with IR based on QUICKI values lower than the cut-off point. IR prevalence was 72.5% in men and 57.6% in women. The presence of the IR was not influenced by either the time of the HIV diagnosis or by the duration of cART. Decreased adiponectin and increased serum triglycerides were associated with increased IR in men (R=0.43, p=0.007). Hyperleptinemia in women was demonstrated to be associated with the presence of IR (R=0.33, p=0.03).

CONCLUSIONS

Given the significant prevalence of the IR in our young non-diabetic cohort with HIV infection undergoing antiretroviral therapy reported in our study and the consecutive risk of diabetes and cardiovascular events, we suggest that the IR management should be a central component of HIV-infection therapeutic strategy. As adipokines play major roles in regulating glucose homeostasis with levels varying according to the sex, we suggest that further studies investigating adipokines should base their analyses on gender differences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. catalin_tiliscan@yahoo.com.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23351215

Citation

Arama, Victoria, et al. "Insulin Resistance and Adipokines Serum Levels in a Caucasian Cohort of Hiv-positive Patients Undergoing Antiretroviral Therapy: a Cross Sectional Study." BMC Endocrine Disorders, vol. 13, 2013, p. 4.
Arama V, Tiliscan C, Streinu-Cercel A, et al. Insulin resistance and adipokines serum levels in a caucasian cohort of hiv-positive patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy: a cross sectional study. BMC Endocr Disord. 2013;13:4.
Arama, V., Tiliscan, C., Streinu-Cercel, A., Ion, D., Mihailescu, R., Munteanu, D., ... Arama, S. S. (2013). Insulin resistance and adipokines serum levels in a caucasian cohort of hiv-positive patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy: a cross sectional study. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 13, p. 4. doi:10.1186/1472-6823-13-4.
Arama V, et al. Insulin Resistance and Adipokines Serum Levels in a Caucasian Cohort of Hiv-positive Patients Undergoing Antiretroviral Therapy: a Cross Sectional Study. BMC Endocr Disord. 2013 Jan 26;13:4. PubMed PMID: 23351215.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Insulin resistance and adipokines serum levels in a caucasian cohort of hiv-positive patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy: a cross sectional study. AU - Arama,Victoria, AU - Tiliscan,Catalin, AU - Streinu-Cercel,Adrian, AU - Ion,Daniela, AU - Mihailescu,Raluca, AU - Munteanu,Daniela, AU - Hristea,Adriana, AU - Arama,Stefan Sorin, AU - ,, Y1 - 2013/01/26/ PY - 2012/06/27/received PY - 2013/01/23/accepted PY - 2013/1/29/entrez PY - 2013/1/29/pubmed PY - 2013/1/29/medline SP - 4 EP - 4 JF - BMC endocrine disorders JO - BMC Endocr Disord VL - 13 N2 - METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in an unselected sample of 89 HIV-1-positive, non-diabetic patients undergoing stable cART for at least 6 months. Metabolic parameters were measured, including fasting plasma insulin, and circulating adiponectin, leptin, resistin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. Insulin resistance was estimated by measuring the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI), using a cut-off value of 0.33. A linear regression model was fitted to QUICKI to test the association of IR and adipokines levels. RESULTS: A total of 89 patients (aged 18-65, median: 28 years) including 51 men (57.3%) and 38 women (42.7%) were included in the study. Fifty nine patients (66.3%) were diagnosed with IR based on QUICKI values lower than the cut-off point. IR prevalence was 72.5% in men and 57.6% in women. The presence of the IR was not influenced by either the time of the HIV diagnosis or by the duration of cART. Decreased adiponectin and increased serum triglycerides were associated with increased IR in men (R=0.43, p=0.007). Hyperleptinemia in women was demonstrated to be associated with the presence of IR (R=0.33, p=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Given the significant prevalence of the IR in our young non-diabetic cohort with HIV infection undergoing antiretroviral therapy reported in our study and the consecutive risk of diabetes and cardiovascular events, we suggest that the IR management should be a central component of HIV-infection therapeutic strategy. As adipokines play major roles in regulating glucose homeostasis with levels varying according to the sex, we suggest that further studies investigating adipokines should base their analyses on gender differences. SN - 1472-6823 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23351215/Insulin_resistance_and_adipokines_serum_levels_in_a_caucasian_cohort_of_hiv_positive_patients_undergoing_antiretroviral_therapy:_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://bmcendocrdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6823-13-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -