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Serum and dietary antioxidant status is associated with lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a study in Shanghai, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of our study was to examine the association between the metabolic syndrome (MS) and serum antioxidant status.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study was conducted with 221 cases and 329 controls aged 18 to 65 years. Weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and lipids, as well as serum superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, malondialdehide, vitamins A, E, β-carotene and lycopene were examined. Intakes of antioxidants were also estimated.

RESULTS

Mean serum superoxide dismutase activity, β-carotene concentrations were significantly lower, malondialdehide was higher (p<0.05) in persons with the MS (after adjusting for age, sex) than those without. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and β- carotene also decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increased number of components of the MS. Low levels of serum superoxide dismutase activity and β-carotene concentration appeared to be associated with the MS status. Moreover, dietary energy, carbohydrate, vitamin C, zinc and copper intake in the MS patients were lower, but fat intake were higher. Vitamins E, C and manganese intake decreased with the elevated number of the MS components. For zinc and manganese, a lower risk was observed for other quartile of intake compared with the first one. Inverse links between dietary fat, energy intake and serum antioxidant status were found in MS patients, meanwhile dietary vitamin C was positively related with serum antioxidant level.

CONCLUSIONS

Serum antioxidant status was associated with a lower prevalence of the MS, and with lower dietary fat, energy intake and higher vitamin C intake.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, PRChina.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Blood Glucose
    Blood Pressure
    Body Mass Index
    Carotenoids
    Case-Control Studies
    China
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Dietary Carbohydrates
    Energy Intake
    Female
    Glutathione Peroxidase
    Humans
    Linear Models
    Logistic Models
    Lycopene
    Male
    Malondialdehyde
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Nutrition Assessment
    Nutritional Status
    Oxidative Stress
    Prevalence
    Superoxide Dismutase
    Vitamin A
    Vitamin E
    Waist Circumference
    Young Adult
    Zinc
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23353612

    Citation

    Li, Yanrong, et al. "Serum and Dietary Antioxidant Status Is Associated With Lower Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in a Study in Shanghai, China." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 22, no. 1, 2013, pp. 60-8.
    Li Y, Guo H, Wu M, et al. Serum and dietary antioxidant status is associated with lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a study in Shanghai, China. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2013;22(1):60-8.
    Li, Y., Guo, H., Wu, M., & Liu, M. (2013). Serum and dietary antioxidant status is associated with lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a study in Shanghai, China. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 22(1), pp. 60-8. doi:10.6133/apjcn.2013.22.1.06.
    Li Y, et al. Serum and Dietary Antioxidant Status Is Associated With Lower Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in a Study in Shanghai, China. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2013;22(1):60-8. PubMed PMID: 23353612.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Serum and dietary antioxidant status is associated with lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a study in Shanghai, China. AU - Li,Yanrong, AU - Guo,Hongwei, AU - Wu,Min, AU - Liu,Ming, PY - 2013/1/29/entrez PY - 2013/1/29/pubmed PY - 2013/3/13/medline SP - 60 EP - 8 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to examine the association between the metabolic syndrome (MS) and serum antioxidant status. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 221 cases and 329 controls aged 18 to 65 years. Weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and lipids, as well as serum superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, malondialdehide, vitamins A, E, β-carotene and lycopene were examined. Intakes of antioxidants were also estimated. RESULTS: Mean serum superoxide dismutase activity, β-carotene concentrations were significantly lower, malondialdehide was higher (p<0.05) in persons with the MS (after adjusting for age, sex) than those without. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and β- carotene also decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increased number of components of the MS. Low levels of serum superoxide dismutase activity and β-carotene concentration appeared to be associated with the MS status. Moreover, dietary energy, carbohydrate, vitamin C, zinc and copper intake in the MS patients were lower, but fat intake were higher. Vitamins E, C and manganese intake decreased with the elevated number of the MS components. For zinc and manganese, a lower risk was observed for other quartile of intake compared with the first one. Inverse links between dietary fat, energy intake and serum antioxidant status were found in MS patients, meanwhile dietary vitamin C was positively related with serum antioxidant level. CONCLUSIONS: Serum antioxidant status was associated with a lower prevalence of the MS, and with lower dietary fat, energy intake and higher vitamin C intake. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23353612/Serum_and_dietary_antioxidant_status_is_associated_with_lower_prevalence_of_the_metabolic_syndrome_in_a_study_in_Shanghai_China_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/22/1/60.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -