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The association of tea consumption with bladder cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

Abstract

The association between tea consumption and bladder cancer has been confirmed in several animal studies, but one epidemiological study in 2001 showed no association between them. In order to provide an accurate assessment of this, we conducted a meta-analysis on tea consumption and bladder cancer risk. Studies were identified by a literature search in PubMed from January 1980 to March 2012 and the reference lists of relevant studies. Random effect models were used to calculate summary relative risk estimates (RR) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on high contrast to low intake values. Twenty-four publications (6 cohort studies and 18 case-control studies) based on consumption of overall tea, black tea, and green tea to bladder cancer risk were included in this analysis. For overall tea, the summary RR indicated no association between tea consumption and bladder cancer (RR= 1.09, 95%CI: 0.85-1.40). In subgroup analyses, we found a moderate increase of bladder cancer risk in smoking group (RR= 1.77, 95%CI: 1.04-3.01). In the black tea group, no statistically significant association was observed (RR= 0.84, 95%CI: 0.70-1.01). Interestingly, in the subgroup of sex, a protective effect was observed between tea consumption and bladder cancer risk in female (RR= 0.61, 95%CI: 0.38- 0.98). For green tea group, there was no relationship associated with bladder cancer risk (RR= 1.03, 95%CI: 0.82- 1.31). In conclusion, our data suggest that high overall tea intake in smokers increased the risk of bladder cancer, and high black tea intake in female may reduce the risk of bladder cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Urology, Shunde First People's Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangdong, China.

    , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Case-Control Studies
    Cohort Studies
    Epidemiologic Studies
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Risk Factors
    Sex Factors
    Smoking
    Tea
    Urinary Bladder Neoplasms

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23353620

    Citation

    Wu, Shihao, et al. "The Association of Tea Consumption With Bladder Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 22, no. 1, 2013, pp. 128-37.
    Wu S, Li F, Huang X, et al. The association of tea consumption with bladder cancer risk: a meta-analysis. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2013;22(1):128-37.
    Wu, S., Li, F., Huang, X., Hua, Q., Huang, T., Liu, Z., ... Zhang, X. (2013). The association of tea consumption with bladder cancer risk: a meta-analysis. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 22(1), pp. 128-37. doi:10.6133/apjcn.2013.22.1.15.
    Wu S, et al. The Association of Tea Consumption With Bladder Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2013;22(1):128-37. PubMed PMID: 23353620.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The association of tea consumption with bladder cancer risk: a meta-analysis. AU - Wu,Shihao, AU - Li,Fei, AU - Huang,Xiao, AU - Hua,Qingsheng, AU - Huang,Tao, AU - Liu,Zhile, AU - Liu,Zhixiang, AU - Zhang,Zhaofei, AU - Liao,Chunxian, AU - Chen,Yuanxiang, AU - Shi,Yuqiang, AU - Zeng,Renchuang, AU - Feng,Mingen, AU - Zhong,Xintai, AU - Long,Zhaolin, AU - Tan,Wanlong, AU - Zhang,Xinji, PY - 2013/1/29/entrez PY - 2013/1/29/pubmed PY - 2013/3/13/medline SP - 128 EP - 37 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - The association between tea consumption and bladder cancer has been confirmed in several animal studies, but one epidemiological study in 2001 showed no association between them. In order to provide an accurate assessment of this, we conducted a meta-analysis on tea consumption and bladder cancer risk. Studies were identified by a literature search in PubMed from January 1980 to March 2012 and the reference lists of relevant studies. Random effect models were used to calculate summary relative risk estimates (RR) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on high contrast to low intake values. Twenty-four publications (6 cohort studies and 18 case-control studies) based on consumption of overall tea, black tea, and green tea to bladder cancer risk were included in this analysis. For overall tea, the summary RR indicated no association between tea consumption and bladder cancer (RR= 1.09, 95%CI: 0.85-1.40). In subgroup analyses, we found a moderate increase of bladder cancer risk in smoking group (RR= 1.77, 95%CI: 1.04-3.01). In the black tea group, no statistically significant association was observed (RR= 0.84, 95%CI: 0.70-1.01). Interestingly, in the subgroup of sex, a protective effect was observed between tea consumption and bladder cancer risk in female (RR= 0.61, 95%CI: 0.38- 0.98). For green tea group, there was no relationship associated with bladder cancer risk (RR= 1.03, 95%CI: 0.82- 1.31). In conclusion, our data suggest that high overall tea intake in smokers increased the risk of bladder cancer, and high black tea intake in female may reduce the risk of bladder cancer. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23353620/The_association_of_tea_consumption_with_bladder_cancer_risk:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/22/1/128.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -