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Drunk, but not blind: the effects of alcohol intoxication on change blindness.
Conscious Cogn 2013; 22(1):231-6CC

Abstract

Alcohol use has long been assumed to alter cognition via attentional processes. To better understand the cognitive consequences of intoxication, the present study tested the effects of moderate intoxication (average BAC between .071 and .082) on attentional processing using complex working memory capacity (WMC) span tasks and a change blindness task. Intoxicated and sober participants were matched on baseline WMC performance, and intoxication significantly decreased performance on the complex span tasks. Surprisingly, intoxication improved performance on the change blindness task. The results are interpreted as evidence that intoxication decreases attentional control, causing either a shift towards more passive processing and/or a more diffuse attentional state. This may result in decreased performance on tasks where attentional control or focus are required, but may actually facilitate performance in some contexts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1007 W. Harrison St. (M/C 285), Chicago, IL 60607, USA. gcolflesh@casl.umd.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23357240

Citation

Colflesh, Gregory J H., and Jennifer Wiley. "Drunk, but Not Blind: the Effects of Alcohol Intoxication On Change Blindness." Consciousness and Cognition, vol. 22, no. 1, 2013, pp. 231-6.
Colflesh GJ, Wiley J. Drunk, but not blind: the effects of alcohol intoxication on change blindness. Conscious Cogn. 2013;22(1):231-6.
Colflesh, G. J., & Wiley, J. (2013). Drunk, but not blind: the effects of alcohol intoxication on change blindness. Consciousness and Cognition, 22(1), pp. 231-6. doi:10.1016/j.concog.2013.01.001.
Colflesh GJ, Wiley J. Drunk, but Not Blind: the Effects of Alcohol Intoxication On Change Blindness. Conscious Cogn. 2013;22(1):231-6. PubMed PMID: 23357240.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Drunk, but not blind: the effects of alcohol intoxication on change blindness. AU - Colflesh,Gregory J H, AU - Wiley,Jennifer, Y1 - 2013/01/28/ PY - 2012/08/15/received PY - 2012/12/26/revised PY - 2013/01/02/accepted PY - 2013/1/30/entrez PY - 2013/1/30/pubmed PY - 2013/8/30/medline SP - 231 EP - 6 JF - Consciousness and cognition JO - Conscious Cogn VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - Alcohol use has long been assumed to alter cognition via attentional processes. To better understand the cognitive consequences of intoxication, the present study tested the effects of moderate intoxication (average BAC between .071 and .082) on attentional processing using complex working memory capacity (WMC) span tasks and a change blindness task. Intoxicated and sober participants were matched on baseline WMC performance, and intoxication significantly decreased performance on the complex span tasks. Surprisingly, intoxication improved performance on the change blindness task. The results are interpreted as evidence that intoxication decreases attentional control, causing either a shift towards more passive processing and/or a more diffuse attentional state. This may result in decreased performance on tasks where attentional control or focus are required, but may actually facilitate performance in some contexts. SN - 1090-2376 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23357240/Drunk_but_not_blind:_the_effects_of_alcohol_intoxication_on_change_blindness_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1053-8100(13)00003-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -