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Oxygen-reducing biocathodes operating with passive oxygen transfer in microbial fuel cells.
Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Feb 19; 47(4):2085-91.ES

Abstract

Oxygen-reducing biocathodes previously developed for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have required energy-intensive aeration of the catholyte. To avoid the need for aeration, the ability of biocathodes to function with passive oxygen transfer was examined here using air cathode MFCs. Two-chamber, air cathode MFCs with biocathodes produced a maximum power density of 554 ± 0 mW/m(2), which was comparable to that obtained with a Pt cathode (576 ± 16 mW/m(2)), and 38 times higher than that produced without a catalyst (14 ± 3 mW/m(2)). The maximum current density with biocathodes in this air-cathode MFC was 1.0 A/m(2), compared to 0.49 A/m(2) originally produced in a two-chamber MFC with an aqueous cathode (with cathode chamber aeration). Single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs with the same biocathodes initially produced higher voltages than those with Pt cathodes, but after several cycles the catalytic activity of the biocathodes was lost. This change in cathode performance resulted from direct exposure of the cathodes to solutions containing high concentrations of organic matter in the single-chamber configuration. Biocathode performance was not impaired in two-chamber designs where the cathode was kept separated from the anode solution. These results demonstrate that direct-air biocathodes can work very well, but only under conditions that minimize heterotrophic growth of microorganisms on the cathodes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, PR China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23360098

Citation

Xia, Xue, et al. "Oxygen-reducing Biocathodes Operating With Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells." Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 47, no. 4, 2013, pp. 2085-91.
Xia X, Tokash JC, Zhang F, et al. Oxygen-reducing biocathodes operating with passive oxygen transfer in microbial fuel cells. Environ Sci Technol. 2013;47(4):2085-91.
Xia, X., Tokash, J. C., Zhang, F., Liang, P., Huang, X., & Logan, B. E. (2013). Oxygen-reducing biocathodes operating with passive oxygen transfer in microbial fuel cells. Environmental Science & Technology, 47(4), 2085-91. https://doi.org/10.1021/es3027659
Xia X, et al. Oxygen-reducing Biocathodes Operating With Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells. Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Feb 19;47(4):2085-91. PubMed PMID: 23360098.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oxygen-reducing biocathodes operating with passive oxygen transfer in microbial fuel cells. AU - Xia,Xue, AU - Tokash,Justin C, AU - Zhang,Fang, AU - Liang,Peng, AU - Huang,Xia, AU - Logan,Bruce E, Y1 - 2013/02/08/ PY - 2013/1/31/entrez PY - 2013/1/31/pubmed PY - 2013/9/18/medline SP - 2085 EP - 91 JF - Environmental science & technology JO - Environ Sci Technol VL - 47 IS - 4 N2 - Oxygen-reducing biocathodes previously developed for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have required energy-intensive aeration of the catholyte. To avoid the need for aeration, the ability of biocathodes to function with passive oxygen transfer was examined here using air cathode MFCs. Two-chamber, air cathode MFCs with biocathodes produced a maximum power density of 554 ± 0 mW/m(2), which was comparable to that obtained with a Pt cathode (576 ± 16 mW/m(2)), and 38 times higher than that produced without a catalyst (14 ± 3 mW/m(2)). The maximum current density with biocathodes in this air-cathode MFC was 1.0 A/m(2), compared to 0.49 A/m(2) originally produced in a two-chamber MFC with an aqueous cathode (with cathode chamber aeration). Single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs with the same biocathodes initially produced higher voltages than those with Pt cathodes, but after several cycles the catalytic activity of the biocathodes was lost. This change in cathode performance resulted from direct exposure of the cathodes to solutions containing high concentrations of organic matter in the single-chamber configuration. Biocathode performance was not impaired in two-chamber designs where the cathode was kept separated from the anode solution. These results demonstrate that direct-air biocathodes can work very well, but only under conditions that minimize heterotrophic growth of microorganisms on the cathodes. SN - 1520-5851 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23360098/Oxygen_reducing_biocathodes_operating_with_passive_oxygen_transfer_in_microbial_fuel_cells_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/es3027659 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -