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Long-term adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with overall cognitive status, but not cognitive decline, in women.

Abstract

In this large-scale prospective epidemiological study, we examined associations of long-term adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) and subsequent cognitive function and decline. We included 16,058 women from the Nurses' Health Study, aged ≥70 y, who underwent cognitive testing by telephone 4 times during 6 y, beginning in 1995-2001, and provided repeated information on diet between 1984 and the first cognitive exam. Primary outcomes were the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS) and composite scores of verbal memory and global cognition. MeDi adherence was based on intakes of: vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, nuts, fish, red and processed meats, moderate alcohol, and the ratio of monounsaturated:saturated fat. Long-term MeDi exposure was estimated by averaging all repeated measures of diet (>13 y, on average). In primary analyses of cognitive change, the MeDi was not associated with decline in global cognition or verbal memory. In a secondary approach examining cognitive status in older age, determined by averaging all 4 repeated measures of cognition, each higher quintile of long-term MeDi score was linearly associated with better multivariable-adjusted mean cognitive scores [differences in mean Z-scores between extreme quintiles of MeDi = 0.06 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.11); = 0.05 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.08); and = 0.06 (95% CI: 0.03, 0.10) standard units; P-trends = 0.004, 0.002, and <0.001 for TICS, global cognition, and verbal memory, respectively]. These associations were similar to those observed in women 1-1.5 y apart in age. In summary, long-term MeDi adherence was related to moderately better cognition but not with cognitive change in this very large cohort of older women.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. cecilia.samieri@channing.harvard.edu

    , ,

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 143:4 2013 Apr pg 493-9

    MeSH

    Aged
    Animals
    Cognition
    Cognition Disorders
    Diet, Mediterranean
    Edible Grain
    Female
    Fishes
    Fruit
    Humans
    Interviews as Topic
    Meat
    Meat Products
    Memory
    Nuts
    Prospective Studies
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23365105

    Citation

    Samieri, Cécilia, et al. "Long-term Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Is Associated With Overall Cognitive Status, but Not Cognitive Decline, in Women." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 4, 2013, pp. 493-9.
    Samieri C, Okereke OI, E Devore E, et al. Long-term adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with overall cognitive status, but not cognitive decline, in women. J Nutr. 2013;143(4):493-9.
    Samieri, C., Okereke, O. I., E Devore, E., & Grodstein, F. (2013). Long-term adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with overall cognitive status, but not cognitive decline, in women. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(4), pp. 493-9. doi:10.3945/jn.112.169896.
    Samieri C, et al. Long-term Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Is Associated With Overall Cognitive Status, but Not Cognitive Decline, in Women. J Nutr. 2013;143(4):493-9. PubMed PMID: 23365105.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with overall cognitive status, but not cognitive decline, in women. AU - Samieri,Cécilia, AU - Okereke,Olivia I, AU - E Devore,Elizabeth, AU - Grodstein,Francine, Y1 - 2013/01/30/ PY - 2013/2/1/entrez PY - 2013/2/1/pubmed PY - 2013/5/7/medline SP - 493 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 143 IS - 4 N2 - In this large-scale prospective epidemiological study, we examined associations of long-term adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) and subsequent cognitive function and decline. We included 16,058 women from the Nurses' Health Study, aged ≥70 y, who underwent cognitive testing by telephone 4 times during 6 y, beginning in 1995-2001, and provided repeated information on diet between 1984 and the first cognitive exam. Primary outcomes were the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS) and composite scores of verbal memory and global cognition. MeDi adherence was based on intakes of: vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, nuts, fish, red and processed meats, moderate alcohol, and the ratio of monounsaturated:saturated fat. Long-term MeDi exposure was estimated by averaging all repeated measures of diet (>13 y, on average). In primary analyses of cognitive change, the MeDi was not associated with decline in global cognition or verbal memory. In a secondary approach examining cognitive status in older age, determined by averaging all 4 repeated measures of cognition, each higher quintile of long-term MeDi score was linearly associated with better multivariable-adjusted mean cognitive scores [differences in mean Z-scores between extreme quintiles of MeDi = 0.06 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.11); = 0.05 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.08); and = 0.06 (95% CI: 0.03, 0.10) standard units; P-trends = 0.004, 0.002, and <0.001 for TICS, global cognition, and verbal memory, respectively]. These associations were similar to those observed in women 1-1.5 y apart in age. In summary, long-term MeDi adherence was related to moderately better cognition but not with cognitive change in this very large cohort of older women. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23365105/Long_term_adherence_to_the_Mediterranean_diet_is_associated_with_overall_cognitive_status_but_not_cognitive_decline_in_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.169896 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -