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Dietary supplement use and folate status during pregnancy in the United States.
J Nutr. 2013 Apr; 143(4):486-92.JN

Abstract

Adequate folate and iron intake during pregnancy is critical for maternal and fetal health. No previous studies to our knowledge have reported dietary supplement use and folate status among pregnant women sampled in NHANES, a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey. We analyzed data on 1296 pregnant women who participated in NHANES from 1999 to 2006 to characterize overall supplement use, iron and folic acid use, and RBC folate status. The majority of pregnant women (77%) reported use of a supplement in the previous 30 d, most frequently a multivitamin/-mineral containing folic acid (mean 817 μg/d) and iron (48 mg/d). Approximately 55-60% of women in their first trimester reported taking a folic acid- or iron-containing supplement compared with 76-78% in their second trimester and 89% in their third trimester. RBC folate was lowest in the first trimester and differed by supplement use across all trimesters. Median RBC folate was 1628 nmol/L among users and 1041 nmol/L among nonusers. Among all pregnant women, median RBC folate increased with trimester (1256 nmol/L in the first, 1527 nmol/L in the second, and 1773 nmol/L in the third). Given the role of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects, it is notable that supplement use and median RBC folate was lowest in the first trimester of pregnancy, with 55% of women taking a supplement containing folic acid. Future research is needed to determine the reasons for low compliance with supplement recommendations, particularly folic acid, in early pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD, USA. ambranum@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23365107

Citation

Branum, Amy M., et al. "Dietary Supplement Use and Folate Status During Pregnancy in the United States." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 4, 2013, pp. 486-92.
Branum AM, Bailey R, Singer BJ. Dietary supplement use and folate status during pregnancy in the United States. J Nutr. 2013;143(4):486-92.
Branum, A. M., Bailey, R., & Singer, B. J. (2013). Dietary supplement use and folate status during pregnancy in the United States. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(4), 486-92. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.112.169987
Branum AM, Bailey R, Singer BJ. Dietary Supplement Use and Folate Status During Pregnancy in the United States. J Nutr. 2013;143(4):486-92. PubMed PMID: 23365107.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary supplement use and folate status during pregnancy in the United States. AU - Branum,Amy M, AU - Bailey,Regan, AU - Singer,Barbara J, Y1 - 2013/01/30/ PY - 2013/2/1/entrez PY - 2013/2/1/pubmed PY - 2013/5/7/medline SP - 486 EP - 92 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 143 IS - 4 N2 - Adequate folate and iron intake during pregnancy is critical for maternal and fetal health. No previous studies to our knowledge have reported dietary supplement use and folate status among pregnant women sampled in NHANES, a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey. We analyzed data on 1296 pregnant women who participated in NHANES from 1999 to 2006 to characterize overall supplement use, iron and folic acid use, and RBC folate status. The majority of pregnant women (77%) reported use of a supplement in the previous 30 d, most frequently a multivitamin/-mineral containing folic acid (mean 817 μg/d) and iron (48 mg/d). Approximately 55-60% of women in their first trimester reported taking a folic acid- or iron-containing supplement compared with 76-78% in their second trimester and 89% in their third trimester. RBC folate was lowest in the first trimester and differed by supplement use across all trimesters. Median RBC folate was 1628 nmol/L among users and 1041 nmol/L among nonusers. Among all pregnant women, median RBC folate increased with trimester (1256 nmol/L in the first, 1527 nmol/L in the second, and 1773 nmol/L in the third). Given the role of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects, it is notable that supplement use and median RBC folate was lowest in the first trimester of pregnancy, with 55% of women taking a supplement containing folic acid. Future research is needed to determine the reasons for low compliance with supplement recommendations, particularly folic acid, in early pregnancy. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23365107/Dietary_supplement_use_and_folate_status_during_pregnancy_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.169987 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -