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Berries reduce postprandial insulin responses to wheat and rye breads in healthy women.
J Nutr 2013; 143(4):430-6JN

Abstract

Starch in white wheat bread (WB) induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. For rye bread (RB), the glucose response is similar, whereas the insulin response is lower. In vitro studies suggest that polyphenol-rich berries may reduce digestion and absorption of starch and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the effects of berries consumed with WB or RB on postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Healthy females (n = 13-20) participated in 3 randomized, controlled, crossover, 2-h meal studies. They consumed WB or RB, both equal to 50 g available starch, with 150 g whole-berry purée or the same amount of bread without berries as reference. In study 1, WB was served with strawberries, bilberries, or lingonberries and in study 2 with raspberries, cloudberries, or chokeberries. In study 3, WB or RB was served with a mixture of berries consisting of equal amounts of strawberries, bilberries, cranberries, and blackcurrants. Strawberries, bilberries, lingonberries, and chokeberries consumed with WB and the berry mixture consumed with WB or RB significantly reduced the postprandial insulin response. Only strawberries (36%) and the berry mixture (with WB, 38%; with RB, 19%) significantly improved the glycemic profile of the breads. These results suggest than when WB is consumed with berries, less insulin is needed for maintenance of normal or slightly improved postprandial glucose metabolism. The lower insulin response to RB compared with WB can also be further reduced by berries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23365108

Citation

Törrönen, Riitta, et al. "Berries Reduce Postprandial Insulin Responses to Wheat and Rye Breads in Healthy Women." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 4, 2013, pp. 430-6.
Törrönen R, Kolehmainen M, Sarkkinen E, et al. Berries reduce postprandial insulin responses to wheat and rye breads in healthy women. J Nutr. 2013;143(4):430-6.
Törrönen, R., Kolehmainen, M., Sarkkinen, E., Poutanen, K., Mykkänen, H., & Niskanen, L. (2013). Berries reduce postprandial insulin responses to wheat and rye breads in healthy women. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(4), pp. 430-6. doi:10.3945/jn.112.169771.
Törrönen R, et al. Berries Reduce Postprandial Insulin Responses to Wheat and Rye Breads in Healthy Women. J Nutr. 2013;143(4):430-6. PubMed PMID: 23365108.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Berries reduce postprandial insulin responses to wheat and rye breads in healthy women. AU - Törrönen,Riitta, AU - Kolehmainen,Marjukka, AU - Sarkkinen,Essi, AU - Poutanen,Kaisa, AU - Mykkänen,Hannu, AU - Niskanen,Leo, Y1 - 2013/01/30/ PY - 2013/2/1/entrez PY - 2013/2/1/pubmed PY - 2013/5/7/medline SP - 430 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 143 IS - 4 N2 - Starch in white wheat bread (WB) induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. For rye bread (RB), the glucose response is similar, whereas the insulin response is lower. In vitro studies suggest that polyphenol-rich berries may reduce digestion and absorption of starch and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the effects of berries consumed with WB or RB on postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Healthy females (n = 13-20) participated in 3 randomized, controlled, crossover, 2-h meal studies. They consumed WB or RB, both equal to 50 g available starch, with 150 g whole-berry purée or the same amount of bread without berries as reference. In study 1, WB was served with strawberries, bilberries, or lingonberries and in study 2 with raspberries, cloudberries, or chokeberries. In study 3, WB or RB was served with a mixture of berries consisting of equal amounts of strawberries, bilberries, cranberries, and blackcurrants. Strawberries, bilberries, lingonberries, and chokeberries consumed with WB and the berry mixture consumed with WB or RB significantly reduced the postprandial insulin response. Only strawberries (36%) and the berry mixture (with WB, 38%; with RB, 19%) significantly improved the glycemic profile of the breads. These results suggest than when WB is consumed with berries, less insulin is needed for maintenance of normal or slightly improved postprandial glucose metabolism. The lower insulin response to RB compared with WB can also be further reduced by berries. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23365108/Berries_reduce_postprandial_insulin_responses_to_wheat_and_rye_breads_in_healthy_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.169771 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -