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Using Google Trends for influenza surveillance in South China.
PLoS One. 2013; 8(1):e55205.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Google Flu Trends was developed to estimate influenza activity in many countries; however there is currently no Google Flu Trends or other Internet search data used for influenza surveillance in China.

METHODS AND FINDINGS

Influenza surveillance data from 2008 through 2011 were obtained from provincial CDC influenza-like illness and virological surveillance systems of Guangdong, a province in south China. Internet search data were downloaded from the website of Google Trends. Pearson's correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to compare surveillance data and internet search trends. The correlation between CDC ILI surveillance and CDC virus surveillance was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.43, 0.66). The strongest correlation was between the Google Trends term of Fever and ILI surveillance with a correlation coefficient of 0.73 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.79). When compared with influenza virological surveillance, the Google Trends term of Influenza A had the strongest correlation with a correlation coefficient of 0.64 (95% CI: 0.43, 0.79) in the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic period.

CONCLUSIONS

This study shows that Google Trends in Chinese can be used as a complementary source of data for influenza surveillance in south China. More research in the future should develop new models using search trends in Chinese language to estimate local disease activity and detect early signals of outbreaks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. kangmin@yeah.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23372837

Citation

Kang, Min, et al. "Using Google Trends for Influenza Surveillance in South China." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 1, 2013, pp. e55205.
Kang M, Zhong H, He J, et al. Using Google Trends for influenza surveillance in South China. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(1):e55205.
Kang, M., Zhong, H., He, J., Rutherford, S., & Yang, F. (2013). Using Google Trends for influenza surveillance in South China. PloS One, 8(1), e55205. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0055205
Kang M, et al. Using Google Trends for Influenza Surveillance in South China. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(1):e55205. PubMed PMID: 23372837.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Using Google Trends for influenza surveillance in South China. AU - Kang,Min, AU - Zhong,Haojie, AU - He,Jianfeng, AU - Rutherford,Shannon, AU - Yang,Fen, Y1 - 2013/01/25/ PY - 2012/08/31/received PY - 2012/12/28/accepted PY - 2013/2/2/entrez PY - 2013/2/2/pubmed PY - 2013/7/28/medline SP - e55205 EP - e55205 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 8 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Google Flu Trends was developed to estimate influenza activity in many countries; however there is currently no Google Flu Trends or other Internet search data used for influenza surveillance in China. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Influenza surveillance data from 2008 through 2011 were obtained from provincial CDC influenza-like illness and virological surveillance systems of Guangdong, a province in south China. Internet search data were downloaded from the website of Google Trends. Pearson's correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to compare surveillance data and internet search trends. The correlation between CDC ILI surveillance and CDC virus surveillance was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.43, 0.66). The strongest correlation was between the Google Trends term of Fever and ILI surveillance with a correlation coefficient of 0.73 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.79). When compared with influenza virological surveillance, the Google Trends term of Influenza A had the strongest correlation with a correlation coefficient of 0.64 (95% CI: 0.43, 0.79) in the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic period. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that Google Trends in Chinese can be used as a complementary source of data for influenza surveillance in south China. More research in the future should develop new models using search trends in Chinese language to estimate local disease activity and detect early signals of outbreaks. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23372837/Using_Google_Trends_for_influenza_surveillance_in_South_China_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0055205 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -