Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Neonatal outcomes after antenatal influenza immunization during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: impact on preterm birth, birth weight, and small for gestational age birth.
Clin Infect Dis. 2013 May; 56(9):1216-22.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Influenza infection during pregnancy is associated with adverse fetal outcomes such as preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA). Maternal influenza immunization may prevent these adverse infant outcomes during periods of influenza circulation.

METHODS

We conducted a retrospective cohort study of live births within Kaiser Permanente (KP) Georgia and Mid-Atlantic States (n = 3327) during the period of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus circulation. Primary outcomes were third-trimester preterm birth (27-36 weeks), birth weight, low birth weight (LBW, <2500 g), and SGA.

RESULTS

There were 327 (9.8%) preterm, 236 (7.4%) LBW, and 267 (8.4%) SGA births. Among H1N1-vaccinated mothers (n = 1125), there were 86 (7.6%) preterm, 68 (6.4%) LBW, and 99 (9.3%) SGA births, and the mean birth weight was 3308.5 g (95% confidence interval [CI], 3276.6-3340.4). Among unvaccinated mothers (n = 1581), there were 191 (12.1%) preterm, 132 (8.8%) LBW, and 123 (8.2%) SGA births, and the mean birth weight was 3245.3 g (95% CI, 3216.5-3274.2). Infants of H1N1-vaccinated mothers had 37% lower odds of being born preterm than infants of unvaccinated mothers (adjusted odds ratio, 0.63 [95% CI, .47-.84]). The mean birth weight difference between infants of H1N1-vaccinated mothers and infants of unvaccinated mothers was 45.1 g (95% CI, 1.8-88.3). There was no significant association between maternal H1N1 influenza immunization and LBW or SGA.

CONCLUSIONS

Pregnant women who received H1N1 influenza vaccine were less likely to give birth preterm, and gave birth to heavier infants. The findings support US vaccine policy choices to prioritize pregnant women during the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Health Research–Southeast, Kaiser Permanente, 11 Piedmont Center, 3495 Piedmont Rd NE, Suite 110, Atlanta, GA 30305, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23378281

Citation

Richards, Jennifer L., et al. "Neonatal Outcomes After Antenatal Influenza Immunization During the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: Impact On Preterm Birth, Birth Weight, and Small for Gestational Age Birth." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 56, no. 9, 2013, pp. 1216-22.
Richards JL, Hansen C, Bredfeldt C, et al. Neonatal outcomes after antenatal influenza immunization during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: impact on preterm birth, birth weight, and small for gestational age birth. Clin Infect Dis. 2013;56(9):1216-22.
Richards, J. L., Hansen, C., Bredfeldt, C., Bednarczyk, R. A., Steinhoff, M. C., Adjaye-Gbewonyo, D., Ault, K., Gallagher, M., Orenstein, W., Davis, R. L., & Omer, S. B. (2013). Neonatal outcomes after antenatal influenza immunization during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: impact on preterm birth, birth weight, and small for gestational age birth. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 56(9), 1216-22. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cit045
Richards JL, et al. Neonatal Outcomes After Antenatal Influenza Immunization During the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: Impact On Preterm Birth, Birth Weight, and Small for Gestational Age Birth. Clin Infect Dis. 2013;56(9):1216-22. PubMed PMID: 23378281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neonatal outcomes after antenatal influenza immunization during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: impact on preterm birth, birth weight, and small for gestational age birth. AU - Richards,Jennifer L, AU - Hansen,Craig, AU - Bredfeldt,Christine, AU - Bednarczyk,Robert A, AU - Steinhoff,Mark C, AU - Adjaye-Gbewonyo,Dzifa, AU - Ault,Kevin, AU - Gallagher,Mia, AU - Orenstein,Walter, AU - Davis,Robert L, AU - Omer,Saad B, Y1 - 2013/02/01/ PY - 2013/2/5/entrez PY - 2013/2/5/pubmed PY - 2013/9/14/medline SP - 1216 EP - 22 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 56 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Influenza infection during pregnancy is associated with adverse fetal outcomes such as preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA). Maternal influenza immunization may prevent these adverse infant outcomes during periods of influenza circulation. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of live births within Kaiser Permanente (KP) Georgia and Mid-Atlantic States (n = 3327) during the period of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus circulation. Primary outcomes were third-trimester preterm birth (27-36 weeks), birth weight, low birth weight (LBW, <2500 g), and SGA. RESULTS: There were 327 (9.8%) preterm, 236 (7.4%) LBW, and 267 (8.4%) SGA births. Among H1N1-vaccinated mothers (n = 1125), there were 86 (7.6%) preterm, 68 (6.4%) LBW, and 99 (9.3%) SGA births, and the mean birth weight was 3308.5 g (95% confidence interval [CI], 3276.6-3340.4). Among unvaccinated mothers (n = 1581), there were 191 (12.1%) preterm, 132 (8.8%) LBW, and 123 (8.2%) SGA births, and the mean birth weight was 3245.3 g (95% CI, 3216.5-3274.2). Infants of H1N1-vaccinated mothers had 37% lower odds of being born preterm than infants of unvaccinated mothers (adjusted odds ratio, 0.63 [95% CI, .47-.84]). The mean birth weight difference between infants of H1N1-vaccinated mothers and infants of unvaccinated mothers was 45.1 g (95% CI, 1.8-88.3). There was no significant association between maternal H1N1 influenza immunization and LBW or SGA. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women who received H1N1 influenza vaccine were less likely to give birth preterm, and gave birth to heavier infants. The findings support US vaccine policy choices to prioritize pregnant women during the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23378281/Neonatal_outcomes_after_antenatal_influenza_immunization_during_the_2009_H1N1_influenza_pandemic:_impact_on_preterm_birth_birth_weight_and_small_for_gestational_age_birth_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cid/cit045 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -