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Comparison of four self-report measures and a generic mood question to screen for anxiety during pregnancy in English-speaking women.
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jun; 148(2-3):347-51.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Increasingly researchers and clinicians have called for perinatal mental health depression screening to be broadened to also screen for significant levels of anxiety. This study therefore aimed to compare the screening performance during pregnancy of four self-report anxiety measures, as well as a generic mood question.

METHOD

The measures tested were two measures of general anxiety (the anxiety subscales of the Edinburgh Depression Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and two measures of pregnancy specific anxiety by Huizink and colleagues, and Rini and colleagues (both originally called the Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire). A generic mood question (Matthey Generic Mood Question) asking about stress, anxiety, unhappiness or difficulty coping was also tested. Between 132 and 389 women completed these measures at their first antenatal clinic appointment and up to 249 women completed a diagnostic interview and various measures two weeks later.

RESULTS

The generic mood question performed best, detecting between 58% and 87% of high scorers on the other measures, including 80% of the women with an anxiety disorder. The next best measure was the EDS anxiety subscale, detecting between 26% and 73% of high scorers on the other measures, though this only detected 54% of the women with an anxiety disorder.

LIMITATIONS

Findings are only applicable to English-speaking women. In addition whether the findings can be applied to women later in their pregnancy, or postpartum, is not known.

CONCLUSION

Services wishing to screen for not only possible depression but also possible anxiety should use the generic mood question. For those services which currently use the EDS we recommend they also score the three-item anxiety subscale.

Authors+Show Affiliations

South West Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia. stephen.matthey@sswahs.nsw.gov.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23380518

Citation

Matthey, Stephen, et al. "Comparison of Four Self-report Measures and a Generic Mood Question to Screen for Anxiety During Pregnancy in English-speaking Women." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 148, no. 2-3, 2013, pp. 347-51.
Matthey S, Valenti B, Souter K, et al. Comparison of four self-report measures and a generic mood question to screen for anxiety during pregnancy in English-speaking women. J Affect Disord. 2013;148(2-3):347-51.
Matthey, S., Valenti, B., Souter, K., & Ross-Hamid, C. (2013). Comparison of four self-report measures and a generic mood question to screen for anxiety during pregnancy in English-speaking women. Journal of Affective Disorders, 148(2-3), 347-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2012.12.022
Matthey S, et al. Comparison of Four Self-report Measures and a Generic Mood Question to Screen for Anxiety During Pregnancy in English-speaking Women. J Affect Disord. 2013;148(2-3):347-51. PubMed PMID: 23380518.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of four self-report measures and a generic mood question to screen for anxiety during pregnancy in English-speaking women. AU - Matthey,Stephen, AU - Valenti,Barbara, AU - Souter,Kay, AU - Ross-Hamid,Clodagh, Y1 - 2013/02/04/ PY - 2012/09/27/received PY - 2012/12/24/revised PY - 2012/12/24/accepted PY - 2013/2/6/entrez PY - 2013/2/6/pubmed PY - 2014/8/15/medline SP - 347 EP - 51 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 148 IS - 2-3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Increasingly researchers and clinicians have called for perinatal mental health depression screening to be broadened to also screen for significant levels of anxiety. This study therefore aimed to compare the screening performance during pregnancy of four self-report anxiety measures, as well as a generic mood question. METHOD: The measures tested were two measures of general anxiety (the anxiety subscales of the Edinburgh Depression Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and two measures of pregnancy specific anxiety by Huizink and colleagues, and Rini and colleagues (both originally called the Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire). A generic mood question (Matthey Generic Mood Question) asking about stress, anxiety, unhappiness or difficulty coping was also tested. Between 132 and 389 women completed these measures at their first antenatal clinic appointment and up to 249 women completed a diagnostic interview and various measures two weeks later. RESULTS: The generic mood question performed best, detecting between 58% and 87% of high scorers on the other measures, including 80% of the women with an anxiety disorder. The next best measure was the EDS anxiety subscale, detecting between 26% and 73% of high scorers on the other measures, though this only detected 54% of the women with an anxiety disorder. LIMITATIONS: Findings are only applicable to English-speaking women. In addition whether the findings can be applied to women later in their pregnancy, or postpartum, is not known. CONCLUSION: Services wishing to screen for not only possible depression but also possible anxiety should use the generic mood question. For those services which currently use the EDS we recommend they also score the three-item anxiety subscale. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23380518/Comparison_of_four_self_report_measures_and_a_generic_mood_question_to_screen_for_anxiety_during_pregnancy_in_English_speaking_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(12)00855-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -