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Developmental trends in peer victimization and emotional distress in LGB and heterosexual youth.
Pediatrics. 2013 Mar; 131(3):423-30.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study had 2 objectives: Our first objective was to provide the first evidence of developmental trends in victimization rates for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB)- and heterosexual-identified youth, both in absolute and relative terms, and to examine differences by gender. Our second objective was to examine links between victimization, sexual identity, and later emotional distress.

METHODS

Data are from a nationally representative prospective cohort study of youth in England were collected annually between 2004 and 2010. Our final analytic dataset includes 4135 participants with data at all 7 waves; 4.5% (n = 187) identified as LGB. Analyses included hierarchical linear modeling, propensity score matching, and structural equation modeling.

RESULTS

LGB victimization rates decreased in absolute terms. However, trends in relative rates were more nuanced: Gay/bisexual-identified boys became more likely to be victimized compared with heterosexual-identified boys (wave 1: odds ratio [OR] = 1.78, P = .011; wave 7: OR = 3.95, P = .001), whereas relative rates among girls approached parity (wave 1: OR = 1.95, P = .001; wave 7: OR = 1.18, P = .689), suggesting different LGB-heterosexual relative victimization rate trends for boys and girls. Early victimization and emotional distress explained about 50% of later LGB-heterosexual emotional distress disparities for both boys and girls (each P < .015).

CONCLUSIONS

Victimization of LGB youth decreases in absolute, but not necessarily relative, terms. The findings suggest that addressing LGB victimization during adolescence is critical to reducing LGB-heterosexual emotional distress disparities but additional support may be necessary to fully eliminate these disparities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820, USA. jpr@illinois.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23382442

Citation

Robinson, Joseph P., et al. "Developmental Trends in Peer Victimization and Emotional Distress in LGB and Heterosexual Youth." Pediatrics, vol. 131, no. 3, 2013, pp. 423-30.
Robinson JP, Espelage DL, Rivers I. Developmental trends in peer victimization and emotional distress in LGB and heterosexual youth. Pediatrics. 2013;131(3):423-30.
Robinson, J. P., Espelage, D. L., & Rivers, I. (2013). Developmental trends in peer victimization and emotional distress in LGB and heterosexual youth. Pediatrics, 131(3), 423-30. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-2595
Robinson JP, Espelage DL, Rivers I. Developmental Trends in Peer Victimization and Emotional Distress in LGB and Heterosexual Youth. Pediatrics. 2013;131(3):423-30. PubMed PMID: 23382442.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Developmental trends in peer victimization and emotional distress in LGB and heterosexual youth. AU - Robinson,Joseph P, AU - Espelage,Dorothy L, AU - Rivers,Ian, Y1 - 2013/02/04/ PY - 2013/2/6/entrez PY - 2013/2/6/pubmed PY - 2013/5/4/medline SP - 423 EP - 30 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 131 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study had 2 objectives: Our first objective was to provide the first evidence of developmental trends in victimization rates for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB)- and heterosexual-identified youth, both in absolute and relative terms, and to examine differences by gender. Our second objective was to examine links between victimization, sexual identity, and later emotional distress. METHODS: Data are from a nationally representative prospective cohort study of youth in England were collected annually between 2004 and 2010. Our final analytic dataset includes 4135 participants with data at all 7 waves; 4.5% (n = 187) identified as LGB. Analyses included hierarchical linear modeling, propensity score matching, and structural equation modeling. RESULTS: LGB victimization rates decreased in absolute terms. However, trends in relative rates were more nuanced: Gay/bisexual-identified boys became more likely to be victimized compared with heterosexual-identified boys (wave 1: odds ratio [OR] = 1.78, P = .011; wave 7: OR = 3.95, P = .001), whereas relative rates among girls approached parity (wave 1: OR = 1.95, P = .001; wave 7: OR = 1.18, P = .689), suggesting different LGB-heterosexual relative victimization rate trends for boys and girls. Early victimization and emotional distress explained about 50% of later LGB-heterosexual emotional distress disparities for both boys and girls (each P < .015). CONCLUSIONS: Victimization of LGB youth decreases in absolute, but not necessarily relative, terms. The findings suggest that addressing LGB victimization during adolescence is critical to reducing LGB-heterosexual emotional distress disparities but additional support may be necessary to fully eliminate these disparities. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23382442/Developmental_trends_in_peer_victimization_and_emotional_distress_in_LGB_and_heterosexual_youth_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=23382442 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -