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Gut-brain axis: how the microbiome influences anxiety and depression.
Trends Neurosci. 2013 May; 36(5):305-12.TN

Abstract

Within the first few days of life, humans are colonized by commensal intestinal microbiota. Here, we review recent findings showing that microbiota are important in normal healthy brain function. We also discuss the relation between stress and microbiota, and how alterations in microbiota influence stress-related behaviors. New studies show that bacteria, including commensal, probiotic, and pathogenic bacteria, in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can activate neural pathways and central nervous system (CNS) signaling systems. Ongoing and future animal and clinical studies aimed at understanding the microbiota-gut-brain axis may provide novel approaches for prevention and treatment of mental illness, including anxiety and depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, at St. Joseph's Healthcare, 50 Charlton Ave. E, T3308, Hamilton, ON, L8N 4A6, Canada. jfoster@mcmaster.caNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23384445

Citation

Foster, Jane A., and Karen-Anne McVey Neufeld. "Gut-brain Axis: How the Microbiome Influences Anxiety and Depression." Trends in Neurosciences, vol. 36, no. 5, 2013, pp. 305-12.
Foster JA, McVey Neufeld KA. Gut-brain axis: how the microbiome influences anxiety and depression. Trends Neurosci. 2013;36(5):305-12.
Foster, J. A., & McVey Neufeld, K. A. (2013). Gut-brain axis: how the microbiome influences anxiety and depression. Trends in Neurosciences, 36(5), 305-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tins.2013.01.005
Foster JA, McVey Neufeld KA. Gut-brain Axis: How the Microbiome Influences Anxiety and Depression. Trends Neurosci. 2013;36(5):305-12. PubMed PMID: 23384445.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gut-brain axis: how the microbiome influences anxiety and depression. AU - Foster,Jane A, AU - McVey Neufeld,Karen-Anne, Y1 - 2013/02/04/ PY - 2012/06/29/received PY - 2012/12/27/revised PY - 2013/01/07/accepted PY - 2013/2/7/entrez PY - 2013/2/7/pubmed PY - 2013/12/19/medline SP - 305 EP - 12 JF - Trends in neurosciences JO - Trends Neurosci VL - 36 IS - 5 N2 - Within the first few days of life, humans are colonized by commensal intestinal microbiota. Here, we review recent findings showing that microbiota are important in normal healthy brain function. We also discuss the relation between stress and microbiota, and how alterations in microbiota influence stress-related behaviors. New studies show that bacteria, including commensal, probiotic, and pathogenic bacteria, in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can activate neural pathways and central nervous system (CNS) signaling systems. Ongoing and future animal and clinical studies aimed at understanding the microbiota-gut-brain axis may provide novel approaches for prevention and treatment of mental illness, including anxiety and depression. SN - 1878-108X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23384445/Gut_brain_axis:_how_the_microbiome_influences_anxiety_and_depression_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-2236(13)00008-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -