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(Not) bringing up baby: the effects of jealousy on the desire to have and invest in children.
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2013 Feb; 39(2):206-18.PS

Abstract

The present research uses insights from evolutionary psychology and social cognition to explore the relationship between jealousy-both experimentally activated and chronically accessible-on men's and women's desire to start a family and invest in children. In our first two studies, we found that chronically jealous men and women responded to primed infidelity threat by exhibiting a diminished interest in infants (Study 1) and reporting less happiness upon receiving pregnancy news (Study 2) relative to controls. Study 3 extended these results by examining the effects of jealousy on desired parental investment. Consistent with the proposed theoretical framework, chronically jealous men, but not women, respond to infidelity threat by decreasing their desired level of parental investment relative to controls. Together, these results provide novel empirical support for the hypothesis that jealousy functions to attenuate the reproductive costs associated with partner infidelity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129, USA. s.e.hill@tcu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23386657

Citation

Hill, Sarah E., and Danielle J. Delpriore. "(Not) Bringing Up Baby: the Effects of Jealousy On the Desire to Have and Invest in Children." Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, vol. 39, no. 2, 2013, pp. 206-18.
Hill SE, Delpriore DJ. (Not) bringing up baby: the effects of jealousy on the desire to have and invest in children. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2013;39(2):206-18.
Hill, S. E., & Delpriore, D. J. (2013). (Not) bringing up baby: the effects of jealousy on the desire to have and invest in children. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 39(2), 206-18. https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167212471687
Hill SE, Delpriore DJ. (Not) Bringing Up Baby: the Effects of Jealousy On the Desire to Have and Invest in Children. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2013;39(2):206-18. PubMed PMID: 23386657.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - (Not) bringing up baby: the effects of jealousy on the desire to have and invest in children. AU - Hill,Sarah E, AU - Delpriore,Danielle J, PY - 2013/2/7/entrez PY - 2013/2/7/pubmed PY - 2013/8/24/medline SP - 206 EP - 18 JF - Personality & social psychology bulletin JO - Pers Soc Psychol Bull VL - 39 IS - 2 N2 - The present research uses insights from evolutionary psychology and social cognition to explore the relationship between jealousy-both experimentally activated and chronically accessible-on men's and women's desire to start a family and invest in children. In our first two studies, we found that chronically jealous men and women responded to primed infidelity threat by exhibiting a diminished interest in infants (Study 1) and reporting less happiness upon receiving pregnancy news (Study 2) relative to controls. Study 3 extended these results by examining the effects of jealousy on desired parental investment. Consistent with the proposed theoretical framework, chronically jealous men, but not women, respond to infidelity threat by decreasing their desired level of parental investment relative to controls. Together, these results provide novel empirical support for the hypothesis that jealousy functions to attenuate the reproductive costs associated with partner infidelity. SN - 1552-7433 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23386657/_Not__bringing_up_baby:_the_effects_of_jealousy_on_the_desire_to_have_and_invest_in_children_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0146167212471687?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -