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Dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment: longitudinal profiles and transitions over time.
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Apr; 42(4):607-18.JY

Abstract

Although there is growing recognition of the problem of dating violence, little is known about how it unfolds among young adolescents who are just beginning to date. This study examined classes (subgroups) and transitions between classes over three time points based on dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment perpetration and victimization experienced by youth. The sample was ethnically diverse, consisting of 795 seventh-grade students from schools that were part of a multi-site, longitudinal evaluation of a dating violence initiative (50 % female; 27 % White, 32 % African American, 25 % Latino, 16 % other or multiple races). Results from latent transition analyses revealed five classes of students with distinct behavioral profiles: multi-problem (victimization and perpetration), bullying and sexual harassment (victimization and perpetration), bullying (victimization and perpetration) and sexual harassment (victimization only), bullying (victimization and perpetration), and a least problem group. The majority of classes were characterized by reports of both perpetration and victimization for at least one behavior. Girls were more likely to be in the less problematic classes. Class membership was fairly stable across the three time points. When students transitioned to a different class, the shift was most often from a more problematic to a less problematic class, particularly for girls. The findings support understanding dating violence within a dynamic, developmental process that recognizes related behaviors within and across individuals. Overall, the findings highlight the utility of person-oriented approaches to enhance our understanding of longitudinal profiles and transitions over time for dating violence and related behaviors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA. shari@rti.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23392699

Citation

Miller, Shari, et al. "Dating Violence, Bullying, and Sexual Harassment: Longitudinal Profiles and Transitions Over Time." Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 42, no. 4, 2013, pp. 607-18.
Miller S, Williams J, Cutbush S, et al. Dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment: longitudinal profiles and transitions over time. J Youth Adolesc. 2013;42(4):607-18.
Miller, S., Williams, J., Cutbush, S., Gibbs, D., Clinton-Sherrod, M., & Jones, S. (2013). Dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment: longitudinal profiles and transitions over time. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 42(4), 607-18. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-013-9914-8
Miller S, et al. Dating Violence, Bullying, and Sexual Harassment: Longitudinal Profiles and Transitions Over Time. J Youth Adolesc. 2013;42(4):607-18. PubMed PMID: 23392699.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment: longitudinal profiles and transitions over time. AU - Miller,Shari, AU - Williams,Jason, AU - Cutbush,Stacey, AU - Gibbs,Deborah, AU - Clinton-Sherrod,Monique, AU - Jones,Sarah, Y1 - 2013/02/08/ PY - 2012/10/08/received PY - 2013/01/16/accepted PY - 2013/2/9/entrez PY - 2013/2/9/pubmed PY - 2013/9/17/medline SP - 607 EP - 18 JF - Journal of youth and adolescence JO - J Youth Adolesc VL - 42 IS - 4 N2 - Although there is growing recognition of the problem of dating violence, little is known about how it unfolds among young adolescents who are just beginning to date. This study examined classes (subgroups) and transitions between classes over three time points based on dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment perpetration and victimization experienced by youth. The sample was ethnically diverse, consisting of 795 seventh-grade students from schools that were part of a multi-site, longitudinal evaluation of a dating violence initiative (50 % female; 27 % White, 32 % African American, 25 % Latino, 16 % other or multiple races). Results from latent transition analyses revealed five classes of students with distinct behavioral profiles: multi-problem (victimization and perpetration), bullying and sexual harassment (victimization and perpetration), bullying (victimization and perpetration) and sexual harassment (victimization only), bullying (victimization and perpetration), and a least problem group. The majority of classes were characterized by reports of both perpetration and victimization for at least one behavior. Girls were more likely to be in the less problematic classes. Class membership was fairly stable across the three time points. When students transitioned to a different class, the shift was most often from a more problematic to a less problematic class, particularly for girls. The findings support understanding dating violence within a dynamic, developmental process that recognizes related behaviors within and across individuals. Overall, the findings highlight the utility of person-oriented approaches to enhance our understanding of longitudinal profiles and transitions over time for dating violence and related behaviors. SN - 1573-6601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23392699/Dating_violence_bullying_and_sexual_harassment:_longitudinal_profiles_and_transitions_over_time_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-013-9914-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -