Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Working memory- and anxiety-related behavioral effects of repeated nicotine as a stressor: the role of cannabinoid receptors.
BMC Neurosci 2013; 14:20BN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Like emotional symptoms such as anxiety, modulations in working memory are among the frequently-reported but controversial psychiatric symptoms associated with nicotine (NC) administration. In the present study, repeated NC-induced modulations in working memory, along with concurrently-observed anxiety-related behavioral alterations, were investigated in mice, and compared with the effects of a typical cognition-impairing stressor, immobilization stress (IM). Furthermore, considering the structural and functional contributions of brain cannabinoid (CB) receptors in NC-induced psychiatric symptoms including emotional symptoms, the interactive effects of brain CB receptor ligands (CB ligands) and NC and/or IM on the working memory- and anxiety-related behaviors were examined.

RESULTS

Statistically significant working memory impairment-like behavioral alterations in the Y-maze test and anxiety-like behavioral alterations in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test were observed in the groups of mice treated with 0.8 mg/kg NC (subcutaneous (s.c.) 0.8 mg/kg treatment, 4 days) and/or IM (10 min treatment, 4 days). In the group of mice treated with NC plus IM (NC-IM group), an enhancement of the behavioral alterations was observed. Among the CB type 1 (CB1) antagonist AM 251 (AM), the non-selective CB agonist CP 55,940 (CP), and the CB1 partial agonist/antagonist virodhamine (VD), significant recovering effects were provided by AM (0.2-2.5 mg/kg) and VD (5 mg/kg) against the working memory impairment-like behaviors, whereas significant anxiolytic-like effects (recoveries from both attenuated percentage of entries into open arms and attenuated percentage of time spent on open arms) were provided by VD (1-10 mg/kg) and CP (2 mg/kg) against the anxiety-like behaviors.

CONCLUSIONS

Although working memory impairment- and anxiety-like behavioral alterations were commonly induced in the NC, IM, and NC-IM groups and the therapeutic involvement of CB receptors was shown, there were discrepancies in the types of effective CB ligands between the working memory- and anxiety-related behaviors. The differential involvements of CB receptor subtypes and indirectly activated neurotransmitter systems may contribute to these discrepancies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Legal Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan. thayase@mri.biglobe.ne.jp

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23394117

Citation

Hayase, Tamaki. "Working Memory- and Anxiety-related Behavioral Effects of Repeated Nicotine as a Stressor: the Role of Cannabinoid Receptors." BMC Neuroscience, vol. 14, 2013, p. 20.
Hayase T. Working memory- and anxiety-related behavioral effects of repeated nicotine as a stressor: the role of cannabinoid receptors. BMC Neurosci. 2013;14:20.
Hayase, T. (2013). Working memory- and anxiety-related behavioral effects of repeated nicotine as a stressor: the role of cannabinoid receptors. BMC Neuroscience, 14, p. 20. doi:10.1186/1471-2202-14-20.
Hayase T. Working Memory- and Anxiety-related Behavioral Effects of Repeated Nicotine as a Stressor: the Role of Cannabinoid Receptors. BMC Neurosci. 2013 Feb 9;14:20. PubMed PMID: 23394117.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Working memory- and anxiety-related behavioral effects of repeated nicotine as a stressor: the role of cannabinoid receptors. A1 - Hayase,Tamaki, Y1 - 2013/02/09/ PY - 2012/07/14/received PY - 2013/01/31/accepted PY - 2013/2/12/entrez PY - 2013/2/12/pubmed PY - 2013/8/14/medline SP - 20 EP - 20 JF - BMC neuroscience JO - BMC Neurosci VL - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND: Like emotional symptoms such as anxiety, modulations in working memory are among the frequently-reported but controversial psychiatric symptoms associated with nicotine (NC) administration. In the present study, repeated NC-induced modulations in working memory, along with concurrently-observed anxiety-related behavioral alterations, were investigated in mice, and compared with the effects of a typical cognition-impairing stressor, immobilization stress (IM). Furthermore, considering the structural and functional contributions of brain cannabinoid (CB) receptors in NC-induced psychiatric symptoms including emotional symptoms, the interactive effects of brain CB receptor ligands (CB ligands) and NC and/or IM on the working memory- and anxiety-related behaviors were examined. RESULTS: Statistically significant working memory impairment-like behavioral alterations in the Y-maze test and anxiety-like behavioral alterations in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test were observed in the groups of mice treated with 0.8 mg/kg NC (subcutaneous (s.c.) 0.8 mg/kg treatment, 4 days) and/or IM (10 min treatment, 4 days). In the group of mice treated with NC plus IM (NC-IM group), an enhancement of the behavioral alterations was observed. Among the CB type 1 (CB1) antagonist AM 251 (AM), the non-selective CB agonist CP 55,940 (CP), and the CB1 partial agonist/antagonist virodhamine (VD), significant recovering effects were provided by AM (0.2-2.5 mg/kg) and VD (5 mg/kg) against the working memory impairment-like behaviors, whereas significant anxiolytic-like effects (recoveries from both attenuated percentage of entries into open arms and attenuated percentage of time spent on open arms) were provided by VD (1-10 mg/kg) and CP (2 mg/kg) against the anxiety-like behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Although working memory impairment- and anxiety-like behavioral alterations were commonly induced in the NC, IM, and NC-IM groups and the therapeutic involvement of CB receptors was shown, there were discrepancies in the types of effective CB ligands between the working memory- and anxiety-related behaviors. The differential involvements of CB receptor subtypes and indirectly activated neurotransmitter systems may contribute to these discrepancies. SN - 1471-2202 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23394117/Working_memory__and_anxiety_related_behavioral_effects_of_repeated_nicotine_as_a_stressor:_the_role_of_cannabinoid_receptors_ L2 - https://bmcneurosci.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2202-14-20 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -