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Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, nocturnal disturbances and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease: a case-controlled study using the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder screening questionnaire.
BMC Neurol. 2013 Feb 09; 13:18.BN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Increasing evidence provides a clear association between rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders (RBD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), but the clinical features that determine the co-morbidity of RBD and PD are not yet fully understood.

METHODS

We evaluated the characteristics of nocturnal disturbances and other motor and non-motor features related to RBD in patients with PD and the impact of RBD on their quality of life. Probable RBD (pRBD) was evaluated using the Japanese version of the RBD screening questionnaire (RBDSQ-J).

RESULTS

A significantly higher frequency of pRBD was observed in PD patients than in the controls (RBDSQ-J ≥ 5 or ≥ 6: 29.0% vs. 8.6%; 17.2% vs. 2.2%, respectively). After excluding restless legs syndrome and snorers in the PD patients, the pRBD group (RBDSQ-J≥5) showed higher scores compared with the non-pRBD group on the Parkinson's disease sleep scale-2 (PDSS-2) total and three-domain scores. Early morning dystonia was more frequent in the pRBD group. The Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) domain scores for cognition and emotional well-being were higher in the patients with pRBD than in the patients without pRBD. There were no differences between these two groups with respect to the clinical subtype, disease severity or motor function. When using a cut-off of RBDSQ-J = 6, a similar trend was observed for the PDSS-2 and PDQ-39 scores. Patients with PD and pRBD had frequent sleep onset insomnia, distressing dreams and hallucinations. The stepwise linear regression analysis showed that the PDSS-2 domain "motor symptoms at night", particularly the PDSS sub-item 6 "distressing dreams", was the only predictor of RBDSQ-J in PD.

CONCLUSION

Our results indicate a significant impact of RBD co-morbidity on night-time disturbances and quality of life in PD, particularly on cognition and emotional well-being. RBDSQ may be a useful tool for not only screening RBD in PD patients but also predicting diffuse and complex clinical PD phenotypes associated with RBD, cognitive impairment and hallucinations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kitakobayashi, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23394437

Citation

Suzuki, Keisuke, et al. "Probable Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder, Nocturnal Disturbances and Quality of Life in Patients With Parkinson's Disease: a Case-controlled Study Using the Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire." BMC Neurology, vol. 13, 2013, p. 18.
Suzuki K, Miyamoto T, Miyamoto M, et al. Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, nocturnal disturbances and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease: a case-controlled study using the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder screening questionnaire. BMC Neurol. 2013;13:18.
Suzuki, K., Miyamoto, T., Miyamoto, M., Watanabe, Y., Suzuki, S., Tatsumoto, M., Iwanami, M., Sada, T., Kadowaki, T., Numao, A., Hashimoto, K., Sakuta, H., & Hirata, K. (2013). Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, nocturnal disturbances and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease: a case-controlled study using the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder screening questionnaire. BMC Neurology, 13, 18. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2377-13-18
Suzuki K, et al. Probable Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder, Nocturnal Disturbances and Quality of Life in Patients With Parkinson's Disease: a Case-controlled Study Using the Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire. BMC Neurol. 2013 Feb 9;13:18. PubMed PMID: 23394437.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, nocturnal disturbances and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease: a case-controlled study using the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder screening questionnaire. AU - Suzuki,Keisuke, AU - Miyamoto,Tomoyuki, AU - Miyamoto,Masayuki, AU - Watanabe,Yuka, AU - Suzuki,Shiho, AU - Tatsumoto,Muneto, AU - Iwanami,Masaoki, AU - Sada,Tsubasa, AU - Kadowaki,Taro, AU - Numao,Ayaka, AU - Hashimoto,Kenichi, AU - Sakuta,Hideki, AU - Hirata,Koichi, Y1 - 2013/02/09/ PY - 2012/02/23/received PY - 2013/02/06/accepted PY - 2013/2/12/entrez PY - 2013/2/12/pubmed PY - 2013/8/10/medline SP - 18 EP - 18 JF - BMC neurology JO - BMC Neurol VL - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence provides a clear association between rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders (RBD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), but the clinical features that determine the co-morbidity of RBD and PD are not yet fully understood. METHODS: We evaluated the characteristics of nocturnal disturbances and other motor and non-motor features related to RBD in patients with PD and the impact of RBD on their quality of life. Probable RBD (pRBD) was evaluated using the Japanese version of the RBD screening questionnaire (RBDSQ-J). RESULTS: A significantly higher frequency of pRBD was observed in PD patients than in the controls (RBDSQ-J ≥ 5 or ≥ 6: 29.0% vs. 8.6%; 17.2% vs. 2.2%, respectively). After excluding restless legs syndrome and snorers in the PD patients, the pRBD group (RBDSQ-J≥5) showed higher scores compared with the non-pRBD group on the Parkinson's disease sleep scale-2 (PDSS-2) total and three-domain scores. Early morning dystonia was more frequent in the pRBD group. The Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) domain scores for cognition and emotional well-being were higher in the patients with pRBD than in the patients without pRBD. There were no differences between these two groups with respect to the clinical subtype, disease severity or motor function. When using a cut-off of RBDSQ-J = 6, a similar trend was observed for the PDSS-2 and PDQ-39 scores. Patients with PD and pRBD had frequent sleep onset insomnia, distressing dreams and hallucinations. The stepwise linear regression analysis showed that the PDSS-2 domain "motor symptoms at night", particularly the PDSS sub-item 6 "distressing dreams", was the only predictor of RBDSQ-J in PD. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate a significant impact of RBD co-morbidity on night-time disturbances and quality of life in PD, particularly on cognition and emotional well-being. RBDSQ may be a useful tool for not only screening RBD in PD patients but also predicting diffuse and complex clinical PD phenotypes associated with RBD, cognitive impairment and hallucinations. SN - 1471-2377 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23394437/Probable_rapid_eye_movement_sleep_behavior_disorder_nocturnal_disturbances_and_quality_of_life_in_patients_with_Parkinson's_disease:_a_case_controlled_study_using_the_rapid_eye_movement_sleep_behavior_disorder_screening_questionnaire_ L2 - https://bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2377-13-18 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -