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Detection of human monkeypox in the Republic of the Congo following intensive community education.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2013 May; 88(5):982-985.AJ

Abstract

Monkeypox is an acute viral infection with a clinical course resembling smallpox. It is endemic in northern and central Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), but it is reported only sporadically in neighboring Republic of the Congo (ROC). In October 2009, interethnic violence in northwestern DRC precipitated the movement of refugees across the Ubangi River into ROC. The influx of refugees into ROC heightened concerns about monkeypox in the area, because of the possibility that the virus could be imported, or that incidence could increase caused by food insecurity and over reliance on bush meat. As part of a broad-based campaign to improve health standards in refugee settlement areas, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) sponsored a program of intensive community education that included modules on monkeypox recognition and prevention. In the 6 months immediately following the outreach, 10 suspected cases of monkeypox were reported to health authorities. Laboratory testing confirmed monkeypox virus infection in two individuals, one of whom was part of a cluster of four suspected cases identified retrospectively. Anecdotes collected at the time of case reporting suggest that the outreach campaign contributed to detection of suspected cases of monkeypox.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23400570

Citation

Reynolds, Mary G., et al. "Detection of Human Monkeypox in the Republic of the Congo Following Intensive Community Education." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 88, no. 5, 2013, pp. 982-985.
Reynolds MG, Emerson GL, Pukuta E, et al. Detection of human monkeypox in the Republic of the Congo following intensive community education. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2013;88(5):982-985.
Reynolds, M. G., Emerson, G. L., Pukuta, E., Karhemere, S., Muyembe, J. J., Bikindou, A., McCollum, A. M., Moses, C., Wilkins, K., Zhao, H., Damon, I. K., Karem, K. L., Li, Y., Carroll, D. S., & Mombouli, J. V. (2013). Detection of human monkeypox in the Republic of the Congo following intensive community education. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 88(5), 982-985. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.12-0758
Reynolds MG, et al. Detection of Human Monkeypox in the Republic of the Congo Following Intensive Community Education. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2013;88(5):982-985. PubMed PMID: 23400570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detection of human monkeypox in the Republic of the Congo following intensive community education. AU - Reynolds,Mary G, AU - Emerson,Ginny L, AU - Pukuta,Elisabeth, AU - Karhemere,Stomy, AU - Muyembe,Jean J, AU - Bikindou,Alain, AU - McCollum,Andrea M, AU - Moses,Cynthia, AU - Wilkins,Kimberly, AU - Zhao,Hui, AU - Damon,Inger K, AU - Karem,Kevin L, AU - Li,Yu, AU - Carroll,Darin S, AU - Mombouli,Jean V, Y1 - 2013/02/11/ PY - 2013/2/13/entrez PY - 2013/2/13/pubmed PY - 2013/7/6/medline SP - 982 EP - 985 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 88 IS - 5 N2 - Monkeypox is an acute viral infection with a clinical course resembling smallpox. It is endemic in northern and central Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), but it is reported only sporadically in neighboring Republic of the Congo (ROC). In October 2009, interethnic violence in northwestern DRC precipitated the movement of refugees across the Ubangi River into ROC. The influx of refugees into ROC heightened concerns about monkeypox in the area, because of the possibility that the virus could be imported, or that incidence could increase caused by food insecurity and over reliance on bush meat. As part of a broad-based campaign to improve health standards in refugee settlement areas, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) sponsored a program of intensive community education that included modules on monkeypox recognition and prevention. In the 6 months immediately following the outreach, 10 suspected cases of monkeypox were reported to health authorities. Laboratory testing confirmed monkeypox virus infection in two individuals, one of whom was part of a cluster of four suspected cases identified retrospectively. Anecdotes collected at the time of case reporting suggest that the outreach campaign contributed to detection of suspected cases of monkeypox. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23400570/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.12-0758?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -