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Prevalence of overweight, obesity, and thinness among urban school-aged children and adolescents in southern Nigeria.
Food Nutr Bull. 2012 Dec; 33(4):242-50.FN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Overweight and obesity are public health problems all over the world because of their devastating social, economic, and health consequences, and they coexist with undernutrition in developing countries. Yet, there are few data on the magnitude of these problems in Nigeria.

OBJECTIVE

To assess the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and thinness among urban school-aged children and adolescents.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study of 1,599 children and adolescents 5 to 18 years of age was conducted. The subjects were randomly selected from schools in four urban towns (Lagos, Port Harcourt, Nsukka, and Aba) in southern Nigeria. A validated and pretested questionnaire was used to collect information on the background of the children and adolescents and their parents' socioeconomic status. Weight and height measurements were taken, and body mass indexes were calculated. Overweight, obesity, and thinness were defined according to the International Obesity Task Force cutoff points for children and adolescents 2 to 18 years of age. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, cross tabulations, and chi-squared tests.

RESULTS

The prevalence rates of overweight, obesity, and thinness were 11.4%, 2.8%, and 13.0%, respectively. More females (3.7%) than males (1.8%) were obese (p < .05). The prevalence of overweight was higher among adolescents 10 to 18 years of age (13%) than among children 5 to 9 years of age (9.4%) (p < .001) and was highest (23.1%) at age 15 years. Thinness was significantly more prevalent among children (19.0%) than adolescents (8.3%) (p < .001) and was highest (28.6%) at age 7 years. Age- and sex-related increases and decreases were observed in the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and thinness. The rates of overweight, obesity, and thinness were affected by location and income levels.

CONCLUSIONS

The prevalence rates of overweight and obesity are increasing among urban Nigerian children and adolescents and are of equal magnitude to the prevalence of undernutrition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biochemistry (Nutrition Unit), University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria. nkeneobong@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23424890

Citation

Ene-Obong, Henrietta, et al. "Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Thinness Among Urban School-aged Children and Adolescents in Southern Nigeria." Food and Nutrition Bulletin, vol. 33, no. 4, 2012, pp. 242-50.
Ene-Obong H, Ibeanu V, Onuoha N, et al. Prevalence of overweight, obesity, and thinness among urban school-aged children and adolescents in southern Nigeria. Food Nutr Bull. 2012;33(4):242-50.
Ene-Obong, H., Ibeanu, V., Onuoha, N., & Ejekwu, A. (2012). Prevalence of overweight, obesity, and thinness among urban school-aged children and adolescents in southern Nigeria. Food and Nutrition Bulletin, 33(4), 242-50.
Ene-Obong H, et al. Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Thinness Among Urban School-aged Children and Adolescents in Southern Nigeria. Food Nutr Bull. 2012;33(4):242-50. PubMed PMID: 23424890.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of overweight, obesity, and thinness among urban school-aged children and adolescents in southern Nigeria. AU - Ene-Obong,Henrietta, AU - Ibeanu,Vivian, AU - Onuoha,NneOla, AU - Ejekwu,Ada, PY - 2013/2/22/entrez PY - 2013/2/22/pubmed PY - 2013/4/5/medline SP - 242 EP - 50 JF - Food and nutrition bulletin JO - Food Nutr Bull VL - 33 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are public health problems all over the world because of their devastating social, economic, and health consequences, and they coexist with undernutrition in developing countries. Yet, there are few data on the magnitude of these problems in Nigeria. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and thinness among urban school-aged children and adolescents. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 1,599 children and adolescents 5 to 18 years of age was conducted. The subjects were randomly selected from schools in four urban towns (Lagos, Port Harcourt, Nsukka, and Aba) in southern Nigeria. A validated and pretested questionnaire was used to collect information on the background of the children and adolescents and their parents' socioeconomic status. Weight and height measurements were taken, and body mass indexes were calculated. Overweight, obesity, and thinness were defined according to the International Obesity Task Force cutoff points for children and adolescents 2 to 18 years of age. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, cross tabulations, and chi-squared tests. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of overweight, obesity, and thinness were 11.4%, 2.8%, and 13.0%, respectively. More females (3.7%) than males (1.8%) were obese (p < .05). The prevalence of overweight was higher among adolescents 10 to 18 years of age (13%) than among children 5 to 9 years of age (9.4%) (p < .001) and was highest (23.1%) at age 15 years. Thinness was significantly more prevalent among children (19.0%) than adolescents (8.3%) (p < .001) and was highest (28.6%) at age 7 years. Age- and sex-related increases and decreases were observed in the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and thinness. The rates of overweight, obesity, and thinness were affected by location and income levels. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence rates of overweight and obesity are increasing among urban Nigerian children and adolescents and are of equal magnitude to the prevalence of undernutrition. SN - 0379-5721 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23424890/Prevalence_of_overweight_obesity_and_thinness_among_urban_school_aged_children_and_adolescents_in_southern_Nigeria_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/156482651203300404?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -