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Alcohol consumption on pancreatic diseases.
World J Gastroenterol 2013; 19(5):638-47WJ

Abstract

Although the association between alcohol and pancreatic diseases has been recognized for a long time, the impact of alcohol consumption on pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (PC) remains poorly defined. Nowadays there is not consensus about the epidemiology and the beverage type, dose and duration of alcohol consumption causing these diseases. The objective of this study was to review the epidemiology described in the literature for pancreatic diseases as a consequence of alcoholic behavior trying to understand the association between dose, type and frequency of alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis and PC. The majority of the studies conclude that high alcohol intake was associated with a higher risk of pancreatitis (around 2.5%-3% between heavy drinkers and 1.3% between non drinkers). About 70% of pancreatitis are due to chronic heavy alcohol consumption. Although this incidence rate differs between countries, it is clear that the risk of developing pancreatitis increases with increasing doses of alcohol and the average of alcohol consumption vary since 80 to 150 g/d for 10-15 years. With regard to PC, the role of alcohol consumption remains less clear, and low to moderate alcohol consumption do not appear to be associated with PC risk, and only chronic heavy drinking increase the risk compared with lightly drinkers. In a population of 10%-15% of heavy drinkers, 2%-5% of all PC cases could be attributed to alcohol consumption. However, as only a minority (less than 10% for pancreatitis and 5% for PC) of heavily drinkers develops these pancreatic diseases, there are other predisposing factors besides alcohol involved. Genetic variability and environmental exposures such as smoking and diet modify the risk and should be considered for further investigations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Schulze Center for Novel Therapeutics, Division of Oncology Research, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MA 55905, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23429423

Citation

Herreros-Villanueva, Marta, et al. "Alcohol Consumption On Pancreatic Diseases." World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 19, no. 5, 2013, pp. 638-47.
Herreros-Villanueva M, Hijona E, Bañales JM, et al. Alcohol consumption on pancreatic diseases. World J Gastroenterol. 2013;19(5):638-47.
Herreros-Villanueva, M., Hijona, E., Bañales, J. M., Cosme, A., & Bujanda, L. (2013). Alcohol consumption on pancreatic diseases. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 19(5), pp. 638-47. doi:10.3748/wjg.v19.i5.638.
Herreros-Villanueva M, et al. Alcohol Consumption On Pancreatic Diseases. World J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb 7;19(5):638-47. PubMed PMID: 23429423.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption on pancreatic diseases. AU - Herreros-Villanueva,Marta, AU - Hijona,Elizabeth, AU - Bañales,Jesus Maria, AU - Cosme,Angel, AU - Bujanda,Luis, PY - 2012/06/20/received PY - 2012/08/14/revised PY - 2012/08/16/accepted PY - 2013/2/23/entrez PY - 2013/2/23/pubmed PY - 2013/12/18/medline KW - Acute pancreatitis KW - Alcohol consumption KW - Alcohol metabolism KW - Chronic pancreatitis KW - Genetic variability KW - Pancreatic cancer KW - Risk SP - 638 EP - 47 JF - World journal of gastroenterology JO - World J. Gastroenterol. VL - 19 IS - 5 N2 - Although the association between alcohol and pancreatic diseases has been recognized for a long time, the impact of alcohol consumption on pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (PC) remains poorly defined. Nowadays there is not consensus about the epidemiology and the beverage type, dose and duration of alcohol consumption causing these diseases. The objective of this study was to review the epidemiology described in the literature for pancreatic diseases as a consequence of alcoholic behavior trying to understand the association between dose, type and frequency of alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis and PC. The majority of the studies conclude that high alcohol intake was associated with a higher risk of pancreatitis (around 2.5%-3% between heavy drinkers and 1.3% between non drinkers). About 70% of pancreatitis are due to chronic heavy alcohol consumption. Although this incidence rate differs between countries, it is clear that the risk of developing pancreatitis increases with increasing doses of alcohol and the average of alcohol consumption vary since 80 to 150 g/d for 10-15 years. With regard to PC, the role of alcohol consumption remains less clear, and low to moderate alcohol consumption do not appear to be associated with PC risk, and only chronic heavy drinking increase the risk compared with lightly drinkers. In a population of 10%-15% of heavy drinkers, 2%-5% of all PC cases could be attributed to alcohol consumption. However, as only a minority (less than 10% for pancreatitis and 5% for PC) of heavily drinkers develops these pancreatic diseases, there are other predisposing factors besides alcohol involved. Genetic variability and environmental exposures such as smoking and diet modify the risk and should be considered for further investigations. SN - 2219-2840 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23429423/Alcohol_consumption_on_pancreatic_diseases_ L2 - http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v19/i5/638.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -