Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

RETRACTED ARTICLE

Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean diet.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Observational cohort studies and a secondary prevention trial have shown an inverse association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular risk. We conducted a randomized trial of this diet pattern for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events.

METHODS

In a multicenter trial in Spain, we randomly assigned participants who were at high cardiovascular risk, but with no cardiovascular disease at enrollment, to one of three diets: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat). Participants received quarterly individual and group educational sessions and, depending on group assignment, free provision of extra-virgin olive oil, mixed nuts, or small nonfood gifts. The primary end point was the rate of major cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes). On the basis of the results of an interim analysis, the trial was stopped after a median follow-up of 4.8 years.

RESULTS

A total of 7447 persons were enrolled (age range, 55 to 80 years); 57% were women. The two Mediterranean-diet groups had good adherence to the intervention, according to self-reported intake and biomarker analyses. A primary end-point event occurred in 288 participants. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54 to 0.92) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54 to 0.96) for the group assigned to a Mediterranean diet with extra-virgin olive oil (96 events) and the group assigned to a Mediterranean diet with nuts (83 events), respectively, versus the control group (109 events). No diet-related adverse effects were reported.

CONCLUSIONS

Among persons at high cardiovascular risk, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events. (Funded by the Spanish government's Instituto de Salud Carlos III and others; Controlled-Trials.com number, ISRCTN35739639.).

Links

  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. restruch@clinic.ub.es

    , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    The New England journal of medicine 368:14 2013 04 04 pg 1279-90

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Diet, Fat-Restricted
    Diet, Mediterranean
    Dietary Supplements
    Female
    Humans
    Kaplan-Meier Estimate
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Myocardial Infarction
    Nuts
    Olive Oil
    Plant Oils
    Primary Prevention
    Risk Factors
    Stroke

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Retracted Publication

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23432189

    Citation

    Estruch, Ramón, et al. "Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease With a Mediterranean Diet." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 368, no. 14, 2013, pp. 1279-90.
    Estruch R, Ros E, Salas-Salvadó J, et al. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean diet. N Engl J Med. 2013;368(14):1279-90.
    Estruch, R., Ros, E., Salas-Salvadó, J., Covas, M. I., Corella, D., Arós, F., ... Martínez-González, M. A. (2013). Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean diet. The New England Journal of Medicine, 368(14), pp. 1279-90. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1200303.
    Estruch R, et al. Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease With a Mediterranean Diet. N Engl J Med. 2013 04 4;368(14):1279-90. PubMed PMID: 23432189.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean diet. AU - Estruch,Ramón, AU - Ros,Emilio, AU - Salas-Salvadó,Jordi, AU - Covas,Maria-Isabel, AU - Corella,Dolores, AU - Arós,Fernando, AU - Gómez-Gracia,Enrique, AU - Ruiz-Gutiérrez,Valentina, AU - Fiol,Miquel, AU - Lapetra,José, AU - Lamuela-Raventos,Rosa Maria, AU - Serra-Majem,Lluís, AU - Pintó,Xavier, AU - Basora,Josep, AU - Muñoz,Miguel Angel, AU - Sorlí,José V, AU - Martínez,José Alfredo, AU - Martínez-González,Miguel Angel, AU - ,, Y1 - 2013/02/25/ PY - 2013/2/26/entrez PY - 2013/2/26/pubmed PY - 2013/4/12/medline SP - 1279 EP - 90 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N. Engl. J. Med. VL - 368 IS - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND: Observational cohort studies and a secondary prevention trial have shown an inverse association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular risk. We conducted a randomized trial of this diet pattern for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events. METHODS: In a multicenter trial in Spain, we randomly assigned participants who were at high cardiovascular risk, but with no cardiovascular disease at enrollment, to one of three diets: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat). Participants received quarterly individual and group educational sessions and, depending on group assignment, free provision of extra-virgin olive oil, mixed nuts, or small nonfood gifts. The primary end point was the rate of major cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes). On the basis of the results of an interim analysis, the trial was stopped after a median follow-up of 4.8 years. RESULTS: A total of 7447 persons were enrolled (age range, 55 to 80 years); 57% were women. The two Mediterranean-diet groups had good adherence to the intervention, according to self-reported intake and biomarker analyses. A primary end-point event occurred in 288 participants. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54 to 0.92) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54 to 0.96) for the group assigned to a Mediterranean diet with extra-virgin olive oil (96 events) and the group assigned to a Mediterranean diet with nuts (83 events), respectively, versus the control group (109 events). No diet-related adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Among persons at high cardiovascular risk, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events. (Funded by the Spanish government's Instituto de Salud Carlos III and others; Controlled-Trials.com number, ISRCTN35739639.). SN - 1533-4406 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23432189/Primary_prevention_of_cardiovascular_disease_with_a_Mediterranean_diet_ L2 - https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1200303?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -