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Tobacco smoke increases the risk of otitis media among Greenlandic Inuit children while exposure to organochlorines remain insignificant.
Environ Int 2013; 54:112-8EI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prenatal exposure to environmental levels of organochlorines (OCs) has been demonstrated to have immunotoxic effects in humans. We investigated the relationship between prenatal exposure to OCs and the occurrence of otitis media (OM) among Inuit children in Greenland.

METHODS

We estimated the concentration of 14 PCB congeners and 11 pesticides in maternal and cord blood samples and in breast milk in a population-based cohort of 400 mother-child pairs. At follow-up, we examined the children's ears and used their medical records to assess the OM occurrence and severity. Multivariate regression analyses were used with adjustments for passive smoking, crowding, dietary habits, parent's educational level, breast feeding and the use of child-care.

RESULTS

The children were 4-10 years of age at follow-up and 223 (85%) participated. We found no association between prenatal OC exposure and the development of OM. Factors associated with the child's hazard of OM during the first 4 years of life were: mother's history of OM (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.11-2.59, p=0.01); mother's smoking habits: current (HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.45-4.21, p<0.01) and previous (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.19-3.36, p<0.01); number of smokers in the home (HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.05-1.31, p<0.01). After adjustment mothers' smoking habits remained significant.

CONCLUSION

We found no relationship between high levels of prenatal exposure of OCs and occurrence of OM. Passive smoking was found as the strongest environmental risk factor for the development of OM. Interventions to reduce passive smoke in children's environment are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark. ramon@dadlnet.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23434818

Citation

Jensen, Ramon Gordon, et al. "Tobacco Smoke Increases the Risk of Otitis Media Among Greenlandic Inuit Children While Exposure to Organochlorines Remain Insignificant." Environment International, vol. 54, 2013, pp. 112-8.
Jensen RG, Koch A, Homøe P, et al. Tobacco smoke increases the risk of otitis media among Greenlandic Inuit children while exposure to organochlorines remain insignificant. Environ Int. 2013;54:112-8.
Jensen, R. G., Koch, A., Homøe, P., & Bjerregaard, P. (2013). Tobacco smoke increases the risk of otitis media among Greenlandic Inuit children while exposure to organochlorines remain insignificant. Environment International, 54, pp. 112-8. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2013.01.015.
Jensen RG, et al. Tobacco Smoke Increases the Risk of Otitis Media Among Greenlandic Inuit Children While Exposure to Organochlorines Remain Insignificant. Environ Int. 2013;54:112-8. PubMed PMID: 23434818.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tobacco smoke increases the risk of otitis media among Greenlandic Inuit children while exposure to organochlorines remain insignificant. AU - Jensen,Ramon Gordon, AU - Koch,Anders, AU - Homøe,Preben, AU - Bjerregaard,Peter, Y1 - 2013/02/21/ PY - 2012/09/12/received PY - 2013/01/24/revised PY - 2013/01/25/accepted PY - 2013/2/26/entrez PY - 2013/2/26/pubmed PY - 2013/8/3/medline SP - 112 EP - 8 JF - Environment international JO - Environ Int VL - 54 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure to environmental levels of organochlorines (OCs) has been demonstrated to have immunotoxic effects in humans. We investigated the relationship between prenatal exposure to OCs and the occurrence of otitis media (OM) among Inuit children in Greenland. METHODS: We estimated the concentration of 14 PCB congeners and 11 pesticides in maternal and cord blood samples and in breast milk in a population-based cohort of 400 mother-child pairs. At follow-up, we examined the children's ears and used their medical records to assess the OM occurrence and severity. Multivariate regression analyses were used with adjustments for passive smoking, crowding, dietary habits, parent's educational level, breast feeding and the use of child-care. RESULTS: The children were 4-10 years of age at follow-up and 223 (85%) participated. We found no association between prenatal OC exposure and the development of OM. Factors associated with the child's hazard of OM during the first 4 years of life were: mother's history of OM (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.11-2.59, p=0.01); mother's smoking habits: current (HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.45-4.21, p<0.01) and previous (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.19-3.36, p<0.01); number of smokers in the home (HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.05-1.31, p<0.01). After adjustment mothers' smoking habits remained significant. CONCLUSION: We found no relationship between high levels of prenatal exposure of OCs and occurrence of OM. Passive smoking was found as the strongest environmental risk factor for the development of OM. Interventions to reduce passive smoke in children's environment are needed. SN - 1873-6750 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23434818/Tobacco_smoke_increases_the_risk_of_otitis_media_among_Greenlandic_Inuit_children_while_exposure_to_organochlorines_remain_insignificant_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0160-4120(13)00035-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -