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The acceptability of acupuncture for low back pain: a qualitative study of patient's experiences nested within a randomised controlled trial.
PLoS One. 2013; 8(2):e56806.Plos

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines recommend acupuncture as a clinically effective treatment for chronic back pain. However, there is insufficient knowledge of what factors contribute to patients' positive and negative experiences of acupuncture, and how those factors interact in terms of the acceptability of treatment. This study used patient interviews following acupuncture treatment for back pain to identify, understand and describe the elements that contribute or detract from acceptability of treatment.

METHODS

The study used semi-structured interviews. Twelve patients were interviewed using an interview schedule as a sub-study nested within a randomised controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic back pain. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Three over-arching themes emerged from the analysis. The first entitled facilitators of acceptability contained five subthemes; experience of pain relief, improvements in physical activity, relaxation, psychological benefit, reduced reliance on medication. The second over-arching theme identified barriers to acceptability, which included needle-related discomfort and temporary worsening of symptoms, pressure to continue treatment and financial cost. The third over-arching theme comprised mediators of acceptability, which included pre-treatment mediators such as expectation and previous experience, and treatment-related mediators of time, therapeutic alliance, lifestyle advice and the patient's active involvement in recovery. These themes inform our understanding of the acceptability of acupuncture to patients with low back pain.

CONCLUSION

The acceptability of acupuncture treatment for low back pain is complex and multifaceted. The therapeutic relationship between the practitioner and patient emerged as a strong driver for acceptability, and as a useful vehicle to develop the patients' self-efficacy in pain management in the longer term. Unpleasant treatment related effects do not necessarily detract from patients' overall perception of acceptability.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ann.hopton@york.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23437246

Citation

Hopton, Ann, et al. "The Acceptability of Acupuncture for Low Back Pain: a Qualitative Study of Patient's Experiences Nested Within a Randomised Controlled Trial." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 2, 2013, pp. e56806.
Hopton A, Thomas K, MacPherson H. The acceptability of acupuncture for low back pain: a qualitative study of patient's experiences nested within a randomised controlled trial. PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e56806.
Hopton, A., Thomas, K., & MacPherson, H. (2013). The acceptability of acupuncture for low back pain: a qualitative study of patient's experiences nested within a randomised controlled trial. PloS One, 8(2), e56806. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0056806
Hopton A, Thomas K, MacPherson H. The Acceptability of Acupuncture for Low Back Pain: a Qualitative Study of Patient's Experiences Nested Within a Randomised Controlled Trial. PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e56806. PubMed PMID: 23437246.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The acceptability of acupuncture for low back pain: a qualitative study of patient's experiences nested within a randomised controlled trial. AU - Hopton,Ann, AU - Thomas,Kate, AU - MacPherson,Hugh, Y1 - 2013/02/21/ PY - 2012/06/27/received PY - 2013/01/16/accepted PY - 2013/2/26/entrez PY - 2013/2/26/pubmed PY - 2013/8/24/medline SP - e56806 EP - e56806 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines recommend acupuncture as a clinically effective treatment for chronic back pain. However, there is insufficient knowledge of what factors contribute to patients' positive and negative experiences of acupuncture, and how those factors interact in terms of the acceptability of treatment. This study used patient interviews following acupuncture treatment for back pain to identify, understand and describe the elements that contribute or detract from acceptability of treatment. METHODS: The study used semi-structured interviews. Twelve patients were interviewed using an interview schedule as a sub-study nested within a randomised controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic back pain. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Three over-arching themes emerged from the analysis. The first entitled facilitators of acceptability contained five subthemes; experience of pain relief, improvements in physical activity, relaxation, psychological benefit, reduced reliance on medication. The second over-arching theme identified barriers to acceptability, which included needle-related discomfort and temporary worsening of symptoms, pressure to continue treatment and financial cost. The third over-arching theme comprised mediators of acceptability, which included pre-treatment mediators such as expectation and previous experience, and treatment-related mediators of time, therapeutic alliance, lifestyle advice and the patient's active involvement in recovery. These themes inform our understanding of the acceptability of acupuncture to patients with low back pain. CONCLUSION: The acceptability of acupuncture treatment for low back pain is complex and multifaceted. The therapeutic relationship between the practitioner and patient emerged as a strong driver for acceptability, and as a useful vehicle to develop the patients' self-efficacy in pain management in the longer term. Unpleasant treatment related effects do not necessarily detract from patients' overall perception of acceptability. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23437246/The_acceptability_of_acupuncture_for_low_back_pain:_a_qualitative_study_of_patient's_experiences_nested_within_a_randomised_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0056806 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -