Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Associations of food stamp participation with dietary quality and obesity in children.
Pediatrics. 2013 Mar; 131(3):463-72.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine if obesity and dietary quality in low-income children differed by participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly the Food Stamp Program.

METHODS

The study population included 5193 children aged 4 to 19 with household incomes ≤130% of the federal poverty level from the 1999-2008 NHANES. Diet was measured by using 24-hour recalls.

RESULTS

Among low-income US children, 28% resided in households currently receiving SNAP benefits. After adjusting for sociodemographic differences, SNAP participation was not associated with a higher rate of childhood obesity (odds ratio = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.71-1.74). Both SNAP participants and low-income nonparticipants were below national recommendations for whole grains, fruits, vegetables, fish, and potassium, while exceeding recommended limits for processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages, saturated fat, and sodium. Zero percent of low-income children met at least 7 of 10 dietary recommendations. After multivariate adjustment, compared with nonparticipants, SNAP participants consumed 43% more sugar-sweetened beverages (95% CI: 8%-89%), 47% more high-fat dairy (95% CI: 7%, 101%), and 44% more processed meats (95% CI: 9%-91%), but 19% fewer nuts, seeds, and legumes (95% CI: -35% to 0%). In part due to these differences, intakes of calcium, iron, and folate were significantly higher among SNAP participants. Significant differences by SNAP participation were not evident in total energy, macronutrients, Healthy Eating Index 2005 scores, or Alternate Healthy Eating Index scores.

CONCLUSIONS

The diets of low-income children are far from meeting national dietary recommendations. Policy changes should be considered to restructure SNAP to improve children's health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23439902

Citation

Leung, Cindy W., et al. "Associations of Food Stamp Participation With Dietary Quality and Obesity in Children." Pediatrics, vol. 131, no. 3, 2013, pp. 463-72.
Leung CW, Blumenthal SJ, Hoffnagle EE, et al. Associations of food stamp participation with dietary quality and obesity in children. Pediatrics. 2013;131(3):463-72.
Leung, C. W., Blumenthal, S. J., Hoffnagle, E. E., Jensen, H. H., Foerster, S. B., Nestle, M., Cheung, L. W., Mozaffarian, D., & Willett, W. C. (2013). Associations of food stamp participation with dietary quality and obesity in children. Pediatrics, 131(3), 463-72. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-0889
Leung CW, et al. Associations of Food Stamp Participation With Dietary Quality and Obesity in Children. Pediatrics. 2013;131(3):463-72. PubMed PMID: 23439902.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of food stamp participation with dietary quality and obesity in children. AU - Leung,Cindy W, AU - Blumenthal,Susan J, AU - Hoffnagle,Elena E, AU - Jensen,Helen H, AU - Foerster,Susan B, AU - Nestle,Marion, AU - Cheung,Lilian W Y, AU - Mozaffarian,Dariush, AU - Willett,Walter C, Y1 - 2013/02/25/ PY - 2013/2/27/entrez PY - 2013/2/27/pubmed PY - 2013/5/4/medline SP - 463 EP - 72 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 131 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine if obesity and dietary quality in low-income children differed by participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly the Food Stamp Program. METHODS: The study population included 5193 children aged 4 to 19 with household incomes ≤130% of the federal poverty level from the 1999-2008 NHANES. Diet was measured by using 24-hour recalls. RESULTS: Among low-income US children, 28% resided in households currently receiving SNAP benefits. After adjusting for sociodemographic differences, SNAP participation was not associated with a higher rate of childhood obesity (odds ratio = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.71-1.74). Both SNAP participants and low-income nonparticipants were below national recommendations for whole grains, fruits, vegetables, fish, and potassium, while exceeding recommended limits for processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages, saturated fat, and sodium. Zero percent of low-income children met at least 7 of 10 dietary recommendations. After multivariate adjustment, compared with nonparticipants, SNAP participants consumed 43% more sugar-sweetened beverages (95% CI: 8%-89%), 47% more high-fat dairy (95% CI: 7%, 101%), and 44% more processed meats (95% CI: 9%-91%), but 19% fewer nuts, seeds, and legumes (95% CI: -35% to 0%). In part due to these differences, intakes of calcium, iron, and folate were significantly higher among SNAP participants. Significant differences by SNAP participation were not evident in total energy, macronutrients, Healthy Eating Index 2005 scores, or Alternate Healthy Eating Index scores. CONCLUSIONS: The diets of low-income children are far from meeting national dietary recommendations. Policy changes should be considered to restructure SNAP to improve children's health. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23439902/Associations_of_food_stamp_participation_with_dietary_quality_and_obesity_in_children_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=23439902 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -