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Coffee intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: the Multiethnic Cohort.
Public Health Nutr 2014; 17(6):1328-36PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We evaluated the influence of coffee consumption on diabetes incidence among the Hawaii component of the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC).

DESIGN

Prospective cohort.

SETTING

Population-based sample residing in Hawaii.

SUBJECTS

After exclusions, 75 140 men and women of Caucasian, Japanese American and Native Hawaiian ancestry aged 45-75 years were part of the current analysis. All participants provided information on diet and lifestyle through an FFQ. After 14 years of follow-up 8582 incident diabetes cases were identified using self-reports, medication questionnaires and health plan linkages. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using Cox regression while adjusting for known covariates.

RESULTS

The risk for diabetes associated with total coffee consumption differed by sex (P interaction < 0·0001). Women consuming ≥3 cups of any type of coffee daily had a significantly lower risk (HR = 0·66; 95 % CI 0·58, 0·77; P trend < 0·0001) than those reporting <1 cup/d, whereas the relationship in men was borderline (HR = 0·89; 95 % CI 0·80, 0·99; P trend = 0·09). The same difference by sex was seen for regular coffee consumption, with HR of 0·65 (95 % CI 0·54, 0·78; P trend < 0·0001) and 0·86 (95 % CI 0·75, 0·98; P trend = 0·09) in men and women, respectively. No significant association with diabetes was apparent for decaffeinated coffee in women (HR = 0·85; 95 % CI 0·72, 1·01; P trend = 0·73) or men (HR = 1·07; 95 % CI 0·93, 1·23; P trend = 0·71). Despite small differences by ethnicity, the interaction terms between coffee intake and ethnicity were not significant.

CONCLUSIONS

In this multiethnic population, regular, but not decaffeinated, coffee intake was much more protective against diabetes in women of all ethnic groups than in men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 University of Hawaii Cancer Center, 1236 Lauhala Street, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.1 University of Hawaii Cancer Center, 1236 Lauhala Street, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.2 Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin-Buch, Germany.1 University of Hawaii Cancer Center, 1236 Lauhala Street, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.1 University of Hawaii Cancer Center, 1236 Lauhala Street, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23442347

Citation

Doo, Taisha, et al. "Coffee Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: the Multiethnic Cohort." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 17, no. 6, 2014, pp. 1328-36.
Doo T, Morimoto Y, Steinbrecher A, et al. Coffee intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: the Multiethnic Cohort. Public Health Nutr. 2014;17(6):1328-36.
Doo, T., Morimoto, Y., Steinbrecher, A., Kolonel, L. N., & Maskarinec, G. (2014). Coffee intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: the Multiethnic Cohort. Public Health Nutrition, 17(6), pp. 1328-36. doi:10.1017/S1368980013000487.
Doo T, et al. Coffee Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: the Multiethnic Cohort. Public Health Nutr. 2014;17(6):1328-36. PubMed PMID: 23442347.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: the Multiethnic Cohort. AU - Doo,Taisha, AU - Morimoto,Yukiko, AU - Steinbrecher,Astrid, AU - Kolonel,Laurence N, AU - Maskarinec,Gertraud, Y1 - 2013/02/27/ PY - 2013/2/28/entrez PY - 2013/2/28/pubmed PY - 2014/12/30/medline SP - 1328 EP - 36 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 17 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the influence of coffee consumption on diabetes incidence among the Hawaii component of the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC). DESIGN: Prospective cohort. SETTING: Population-based sample residing in Hawaii. SUBJECTS: After exclusions, 75 140 men and women of Caucasian, Japanese American and Native Hawaiian ancestry aged 45-75 years were part of the current analysis. All participants provided information on diet and lifestyle through an FFQ. After 14 years of follow-up 8582 incident diabetes cases were identified using self-reports, medication questionnaires and health plan linkages. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using Cox regression while adjusting for known covariates. RESULTS: The risk for diabetes associated with total coffee consumption differed by sex (P interaction < 0·0001). Women consuming ≥3 cups of any type of coffee daily had a significantly lower risk (HR = 0·66; 95 % CI 0·58, 0·77; P trend < 0·0001) than those reporting <1 cup/d, whereas the relationship in men was borderline (HR = 0·89; 95 % CI 0·80, 0·99; P trend = 0·09). The same difference by sex was seen for regular coffee consumption, with HR of 0·65 (95 % CI 0·54, 0·78; P trend < 0·0001) and 0·86 (95 % CI 0·75, 0·98; P trend = 0·09) in men and women, respectively. No significant association with diabetes was apparent for decaffeinated coffee in women (HR = 0·85; 95 % CI 0·72, 1·01; P trend = 0·73) or men (HR = 1·07; 95 % CI 0·93, 1·23; P trend = 0·71). Despite small differences by ethnicity, the interaction terms between coffee intake and ethnicity were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: In this multiethnic population, regular, but not decaffeinated, coffee intake was much more protective against diabetes in women of all ethnic groups than in men. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23442347/Coffee_intake_and_risk_of_type_2_diabetes:_the_Multiethnic_Cohort_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980013000487/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -