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Quantification of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in breath using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry--HCN is not a biomarker of Pseudomonas in chronic suppurative lung disease.
J Breath Res. 2013 Mar; 7(1):017105.JB

Abstract

Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in exhaled breath has been proposed as a biomarker for airway inflammation, and also a marker of the presence in the airways of specific organisms, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However the production of HCN by salivary peroxidase in the oral cavity increases orally exhaled concentrations, and may not reflect the condition of the lower airways. Using SIFT-MS we aimed to determine an appropriate single-exhalation breathing maneuver which avoids the interference of HCN produced in the oral cavity. We have established that the SIFT-MS Voice200™ is suitable for the online measurement of HCN in exhaled breath. In healthy volunteers a significantly higher end exhaled HCN concentration was measured in oral exhalations compared to nasal exhalations (mean ± SD) 4.5 ± 0.6 ppb versus 2.4 ± 0.3 ppb, p < 0.01. For the accurate and reproducible quantification of end exhaled HCN in breath a nasal inhalation to full vital capacity and nasal exhalation at controlled flow is recommended. This technique was subsequently used to measure exhaled HCN in a group of patients with chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and known microbiological colonization status to determine utility of HCN measurement to detect P. aeruginosa. Median nasal end exhaled HCN concentrations were higher in patients with CSLD (3.7 ppb) than normal subjects (2.0 ppb). However no differences between exhaled HCN concentrations of subjects colonized with P. aeruginosa and other organisms were identified, indicating that breath HCN is not a suitable biomarker of P. aeruginosa colonization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Respiratory Services, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23445778

Citation

Dummer, Jack, et al. "Quantification of Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) in Breath Using Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass spectrometry--HCN Is Not a Biomarker of Pseudomonas in Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease." Journal of Breath Research, vol. 7, no. 1, 2013, p. 017105.
Dummer J, Storer M, Sturney S, et al. Quantification of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in breath using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry--HCN is not a biomarker of Pseudomonas in chronic suppurative lung disease. J Breath Res. 2013;7(1):017105.
Dummer, J., Storer, M., Sturney, S., Scott-Thomas, A., Chambers, S., Swanney, M., & Epton, M. (2013). Quantification of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in breath using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry--HCN is not a biomarker of Pseudomonas in chronic suppurative lung disease. Journal of Breath Research, 7(1), 017105. https://doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/7/1/017105
Dummer J, et al. Quantification of Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) in Breath Using Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass spectrometry--HCN Is Not a Biomarker of Pseudomonas in Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease. J Breath Res. 2013;7(1):017105. PubMed PMID: 23445778.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quantification of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in breath using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry--HCN is not a biomarker of Pseudomonas in chronic suppurative lung disease. AU - Dummer,Jack, AU - Storer,Malina, AU - Sturney,Sharon, AU - Scott-Thomas,Amy, AU - Chambers,Stephen, AU - Swanney,Maureen, AU - Epton,Michael, Y1 - 2013/02/27/ PY - 2013/3/1/entrez PY - 2013/3/1/pubmed PY - 2013/8/30/medline SP - 017105 EP - 017105 JF - Journal of breath research JO - J Breath Res VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in exhaled breath has been proposed as a biomarker for airway inflammation, and also a marker of the presence in the airways of specific organisms, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However the production of HCN by salivary peroxidase in the oral cavity increases orally exhaled concentrations, and may not reflect the condition of the lower airways. Using SIFT-MS we aimed to determine an appropriate single-exhalation breathing maneuver which avoids the interference of HCN produced in the oral cavity. We have established that the SIFT-MS Voice200™ is suitable for the online measurement of HCN in exhaled breath. In healthy volunteers a significantly higher end exhaled HCN concentration was measured in oral exhalations compared to nasal exhalations (mean ± SD) 4.5 ± 0.6 ppb versus 2.4 ± 0.3 ppb, p < 0.01. For the accurate and reproducible quantification of end exhaled HCN in breath a nasal inhalation to full vital capacity and nasal exhalation at controlled flow is recommended. This technique was subsequently used to measure exhaled HCN in a group of patients with chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and known microbiological colonization status to determine utility of HCN measurement to detect P. aeruginosa. Median nasal end exhaled HCN concentrations were higher in patients with CSLD (3.7 ppb) than normal subjects (2.0 ppb). However no differences between exhaled HCN concentrations of subjects colonized with P. aeruginosa and other organisms were identified, indicating that breath HCN is not a suitable biomarker of P. aeruginosa colonization. SN - 1752-7163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23445778/Quantification_of_hydrogen_cyanide__HCN__in_breath_using_selected_ion_flow_tube_mass_spectrometry__HCN_is_not_a_biomarker_of_Pseudomonas_in_chronic_suppurative_lung_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/7/1/017105 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -