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The dynamics of friendships and victimization in adolescence: a longitudinal social network perspective.
Aggress Behav. 2013 May-Jun; 39(3):229-38.AB

Abstract

This study investigated the development of relational and physical victimization in adolescent friendship networks over time. Using longitudinal social network analysis (SIENA) it was simultaneously tested whether similarity in victimization contributed to friendship formation (selection effects) and whether victimization of friends contributed to changes in victimization (influence effects). This was done for peer-reported relational and physical victimization separately in two middle schools (total N = 480; N = 220, 47% girls, in School 1; N = 260, 52% girls, in School 2) across three time points (Grades 6 through 8; M ages 11.5-13.5). Gender, ethnicity, and baseline aggression were controlled as individual predictors of victimization. Similarity in physical victimization predicted friendship formation, whereas physical victimization was not influenced by friends' victimization but rather by adolescents' own physical aggression. Peer influence effects existed for relational victimization, in that adolescents with victimized friends were more likely to increase in victimization over time as well, over and above the effect of adolescents' own relational aggression. These selection and influence effects were not further qualified by gender. The results suggested that both selection and influence processes as well as individual characteristics play a role in the co-evolution of friendships and victimization, but that these processes are specific for different types of victimization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland. m.sentse@rug.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23446945

Citation

Sentse, Miranda, et al. "The Dynamics of Friendships and Victimization in Adolescence: a Longitudinal Social Network Perspective." Aggressive Behavior, vol. 39, no. 3, 2013, pp. 229-38.
Sentse M, Dijkstra JK, Salmivalli C, et al. The dynamics of friendships and victimization in adolescence: a longitudinal social network perspective. Aggress Behav. 2013;39(3):229-38.
Sentse, M., Dijkstra, J. K., Salmivalli, C., & Cillessen, A. H. (2013). The dynamics of friendships and victimization in adolescence: a longitudinal social network perspective. Aggressive Behavior, 39(3), 229-38. https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.21469
Sentse M, et al. The Dynamics of Friendships and Victimization in Adolescence: a Longitudinal Social Network Perspective. Aggress Behav. 2013 May-Jun;39(3):229-38. PubMed PMID: 23446945.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The dynamics of friendships and victimization in adolescence: a longitudinal social network perspective. AU - Sentse,Miranda, AU - Dijkstra,Jan Kornelis, AU - Salmivalli,Christina, AU - Cillessen,Antonius H N, Y1 - 2013/02/27/ PY - 2012/07/24/received PY - 2013/01/15/accepted PY - 2013/3/1/entrez PY - 2013/3/1/pubmed PY - 2013/10/19/medline SP - 229 EP - 38 JF - Aggressive behavior JO - Aggress Behav VL - 39 IS - 3 N2 - This study investigated the development of relational and physical victimization in adolescent friendship networks over time. Using longitudinal social network analysis (SIENA) it was simultaneously tested whether similarity in victimization contributed to friendship formation (selection effects) and whether victimization of friends contributed to changes in victimization (influence effects). This was done for peer-reported relational and physical victimization separately in two middle schools (total N = 480; N = 220, 47% girls, in School 1; N = 260, 52% girls, in School 2) across three time points (Grades 6 through 8; M ages 11.5-13.5). Gender, ethnicity, and baseline aggression were controlled as individual predictors of victimization. Similarity in physical victimization predicted friendship formation, whereas physical victimization was not influenced by friends' victimization but rather by adolescents' own physical aggression. Peer influence effects existed for relational victimization, in that adolescents with victimized friends were more likely to increase in victimization over time as well, over and above the effect of adolescents' own relational aggression. These selection and influence effects were not further qualified by gender. The results suggested that both selection and influence processes as well as individual characteristics play a role in the co-evolution of friendships and victimization, but that these processes are specific for different types of victimization. SN - 1098-2337 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23446945/The_dynamics_of_friendships_and_victimization_in_adolescence:_a_longitudinal_social_network_perspective_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.21469 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -