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Serum levels of vitamin D are not associated with future risk of venous thromboembolism. The Tromsø Study.
Thromb Haemost. 2013 May; 109(5):885-90.TH

Abstract

Previous studies have provided indirect evidence for a possible association between vitamin D status and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, no study has so far investigated the association between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), the biomarker of vitamin D status, and risk of VTE. The aim of our study was to investigate whether high levels of 25(OH)D were associated with decreased risk of VTE in a prospective population-based study. Serum levels of 25(OH)D were measured in 6,021 men and women, aged 25-84 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995. Incident VTE-events were registered from date of inclusion through the end of follow-up, September 1, 2007. Cox-regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for VTE. There were 201 incident VTE-events during a median of 10.7 years of follow-up. The risk of VTE did not decrease per one standard deviation (SD) (19.8 nmol/l) increase in serum 25(OH)D (multivariable HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.91-1.22). Moreover, subjects with serum 25(OH)D ≥ 70 nmol/l (upper quartile) did not have decreased risk of VTE compared to those ≤ 44 nmol/l (lower quartile) in age- and sex-adjusted analysis (HR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.60-1.37, p for trend across quartiles 0.9) or multivariable analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and physical activity (HR 0.76, 95% CI: 0.45-1.28, p for trend across quartiles 0.9). Subgroup analyses showed no associations between serum levels of 25(OH)D and unprovoked or provoked VTE. In conclusion, in our study, normal serum levels of 25(OH)D were not associated with future risk of VTE, suggesting that vitamin D status does not play an important role in the pathogenesis of VTE. However, our findings did not apply to subjects with vitamin D deficiency (< 30 nmol/l) due to lack of statistical power among these subjects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hematological Research Group (HERG), Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. ellen.brodin@uit.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23446951

Citation

Brodin, E, et al. "Serum Levels of Vitamin D Are Not Associated With Future Risk of Venous Thromboembolism. the Tromsø Study." Thrombosis and Haemostasis, vol. 109, no. 5, 2013, pp. 885-90.
Brodin E, Lerstad G, Grimnes G, et al. Serum levels of vitamin D are not associated with future risk of venous thromboembolism. The Tromsø Study. Thromb Haemost. 2013;109(5):885-90.
Brodin, E., Lerstad, G., Grimnes, G., Brækkan, S. K., Vik, A., Brox, J., Svartberg, J., Jorde, R., & Hansen, J. B. (2013). Serum levels of vitamin D are not associated with future risk of venous thromboembolism. The Tromsø Study. Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 109(5), 885-90. https://doi.org/10.1160/TH12-10-0728
Brodin E, et al. Serum Levels of Vitamin D Are Not Associated With Future Risk of Venous Thromboembolism. the Tromsø Study. Thromb Haemost. 2013;109(5):885-90. PubMed PMID: 23446951.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum levels of vitamin D are not associated with future risk of venous thromboembolism. The Tromsø Study. AU - Brodin,E, AU - Lerstad,G, AU - Grimnes,G, AU - Brækkan,S K, AU - Vik,A, AU - Brox,J, AU - Svartberg,J, AU - Jorde,R, AU - Hansen,J-B, Y1 - 2013/02/28/ PY - 2012/10/18/received PY - 2013/02/09/accepted PY - 2013/3/1/entrez PY - 2013/3/1/pubmed PY - 2013/11/19/medline SP - 885 EP - 90 JF - Thrombosis and haemostasis JO - Thromb Haemost VL - 109 IS - 5 N2 - Previous studies have provided indirect evidence for a possible association between vitamin D status and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, no study has so far investigated the association between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), the biomarker of vitamin D status, and risk of VTE. The aim of our study was to investigate whether high levels of 25(OH)D were associated with decreased risk of VTE in a prospective population-based study. Serum levels of 25(OH)D were measured in 6,021 men and women, aged 25-84 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995. Incident VTE-events were registered from date of inclusion through the end of follow-up, September 1, 2007. Cox-regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for VTE. There were 201 incident VTE-events during a median of 10.7 years of follow-up. The risk of VTE did not decrease per one standard deviation (SD) (19.8 nmol/l) increase in serum 25(OH)D (multivariable HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.91-1.22). Moreover, subjects with serum 25(OH)D ≥ 70 nmol/l (upper quartile) did not have decreased risk of VTE compared to those ≤ 44 nmol/l (lower quartile) in age- and sex-adjusted analysis (HR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.60-1.37, p for trend across quartiles 0.9) or multivariable analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and physical activity (HR 0.76, 95% CI: 0.45-1.28, p for trend across quartiles 0.9). Subgroup analyses showed no associations between serum levels of 25(OH)D and unprovoked or provoked VTE. In conclusion, in our study, normal serum levels of 25(OH)D were not associated with future risk of VTE, suggesting that vitamin D status does not play an important role in the pathogenesis of VTE. However, our findings did not apply to subjects with vitamin D deficiency (< 30 nmol/l) due to lack of statistical power among these subjects. SN - 2567-689X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23446951/Serum_levels_of_vitamin_D_are_not_associated_with_future_risk_of_venous_thromboembolism__The_Tromsø_Study_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1160/TH12-10-0728 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -