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[Acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral and pulmonary edema].
Rev Prat. 2013 Jan; 63(1):18-26.RP

Abstract

Altitude hypoxia is responsible for acute mountain sickness. It can worsen and generate a high altitude cerebral edema, which can be fatal. After reminding the reader clinical and epidemiological facts, this review aims to present new insights of the physiopathological continuity between these two illnesses and the current preventive and treatment tools. Have new medications, as sumatriptans, kept their promises? Have recent studies provide evidence of empirical use of old drugs as aspirin or ibuprofen? What are acetazolamide and dexamethasone places? This wide range of medication doesn't replace non-pharmacological tools.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Antenne médicale des armées de Barby, 13e bataillon de chasseurs alpins, centre médical des armées des Alpes, 73230 Barby, France. romainkedze@hotmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

fre

PubMed ID

23457822

Citation

Kedzierewicz, Romain, and Damien Cabane. "[Acute Mountain Sickness and High Altitude Cerebral and Pulmonary Edema]." La Revue Du Praticien, vol. 63, no. 1, 2013, pp. 18-26.
Kedzierewicz R, Cabane D. [Acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral and pulmonary edema]. Rev Prat. 2013;63(1):18-26.
Kedzierewicz, R., & Cabane, D. (2013). [Acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral and pulmonary edema]. La Revue Du Praticien, 63(1), 18-26.
Kedzierewicz R, Cabane D. [Acute Mountain Sickness and High Altitude Cerebral and Pulmonary Edema]. Rev Prat. 2013;63(1):18-26. PubMed PMID: 23457822.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral and pulmonary edema]. AU - Kedzierewicz,Romain, AU - Cabane,Damien, PY - 2013/3/6/entrez PY - 2013/3/6/pubmed PY - 2013/4/3/medline SP - 18 EP - 26 JF - La Revue du praticien JO - Rev Prat VL - 63 IS - 1 N2 - Altitude hypoxia is responsible for acute mountain sickness. It can worsen and generate a high altitude cerebral edema, which can be fatal. After reminding the reader clinical and epidemiological facts, this review aims to present new insights of the physiopathological continuity between these two illnesses and the current preventive and treatment tools. Have new medications, as sumatriptans, kept their promises? Have recent studies provide evidence of empirical use of old drugs as aspirin or ibuprofen? What are acetazolamide and dexamethasone places? This wide range of medication doesn't replace non-pharmacological tools. SN - 0035-2640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23457822/[Acute_mountain_sickness_and_high_altitude_cerebral_and_pulmonary_edema]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/193 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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