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Serum urate levels and consumption of common beverages and alcohol among Chinese in Singapore.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2013; 65(9):1432-40AC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Western studies suggest that beverages may affect serum urate (SU) levels, but data from Asian populations are scarce. We evaluated the associations between beverages and SU levels in Singaporean Chinese.

METHODS

The study population consisted of 483 subjects ages 45-74 years from the Singapore Chinese Health Study cohort, recruited between 1993 and 1998. Lifestyle factors, medical histories, and diet were collected through in-person interviews. SU levels and other biomarkers were measured from blood collected between 1994 and 1996.

RESULTS

The mean age was 57.6 years and 44% were men. The geometric mean SU level was 321 μmoles/liter (range 157-719). Mean SU levels increased with alcohol consumption (P = 0.024 for trend). The mean SU level of daily alcohol drinkers was 42.6 μmoles/liter higher than that of nondrinkers. Similarly, increasing frequency of green tea intake was associated with rising SU levels. The highest mean SU level was observed in daily green tea drinkers (difference of 25.0 μmoles/liter) relative to nondrinkers (P = 0.009 for trend). Compared to nondrinkers, daily alcohol drinkers had an almost 5-fold increase in association with hyperuricemia (odds ratio [OR] 4.83, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.10-21.23), whereas daily green tea drinkers had a 2-fold increase in association with hyperuricemia (OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.03-4.36). The present study did not show elevated levels of SU in individuals who consumed black tea, coffee, fruit juice, or soda.

CONCLUSION

Alcohol consumption increases SU levels. The finding that daily drinking of green tea is associated with hyperuricemia needs validation in future studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University Medicine Cluster, National University Health System, and Yong Loo School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23463601

Citation

Teng, Gim Gee, et al. "Serum Urate Levels and Consumption of Common Beverages and Alcohol Among Chinese in Singapore." Arthritis Care & Research, vol. 65, no. 9, 2013, pp. 1432-40.
Teng GG, Tan CS, Santosa A, et al. Serum urate levels and consumption of common beverages and alcohol among Chinese in Singapore. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013;65(9):1432-40.
Teng, G. G., Tan, C. S., Santosa, A., Saag, K. G., Yuan, J. M., & Koh, W. P. (2013). Serum urate levels and consumption of common beverages and alcohol among Chinese in Singapore. Arthritis Care & Research, 65(9), pp. 1432-40. doi:10.1002/acr.21999.
Teng GG, et al. Serum Urate Levels and Consumption of Common Beverages and Alcohol Among Chinese in Singapore. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013;65(9):1432-40. PubMed PMID: 23463601.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum urate levels and consumption of common beverages and alcohol among Chinese in Singapore. AU - Teng,Gim Gee, AU - Tan,Chuen Seng, AU - Santosa,Amelia, AU - Saag,Kenneth G, AU - Yuan,Jian-Min, AU - Koh,Woon-Puay, PY - 2012/11/23/received PY - 2013/02/21/accepted PY - 2013/3/7/entrez PY - 2013/3/7/pubmed PY - 2013/11/20/medline SP - 1432 EP - 40 JF - Arthritis care & research JO - Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) VL - 65 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Western studies suggest that beverages may affect serum urate (SU) levels, but data from Asian populations are scarce. We evaluated the associations between beverages and SU levels in Singaporean Chinese. METHODS: The study population consisted of 483 subjects ages 45-74 years from the Singapore Chinese Health Study cohort, recruited between 1993 and 1998. Lifestyle factors, medical histories, and diet were collected through in-person interviews. SU levels and other biomarkers were measured from blood collected between 1994 and 1996. RESULTS: The mean age was 57.6 years and 44% were men. The geometric mean SU level was 321 μmoles/liter (range 157-719). Mean SU levels increased with alcohol consumption (P = 0.024 for trend). The mean SU level of daily alcohol drinkers was 42.6 μmoles/liter higher than that of nondrinkers. Similarly, increasing frequency of green tea intake was associated with rising SU levels. The highest mean SU level was observed in daily green tea drinkers (difference of 25.0 μmoles/liter) relative to nondrinkers (P = 0.009 for trend). Compared to nondrinkers, daily alcohol drinkers had an almost 5-fold increase in association with hyperuricemia (odds ratio [OR] 4.83, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.10-21.23), whereas daily green tea drinkers had a 2-fold increase in association with hyperuricemia (OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.03-4.36). The present study did not show elevated levels of SU in individuals who consumed black tea, coffee, fruit juice, or soda. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption increases SU levels. The finding that daily drinking of green tea is associated with hyperuricemia needs validation in future studies. SN - 2151-4658 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23463601/Serum_urate_levels_and_consumption_of_common_beverages_and_alcohol_among_Chinese_in_Singapore_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.21999 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -