Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A multinational outbreak of histoplasmosis following a biology field trip in the Ugandan rainforest.
J Travel Med. 2013 Mar-Apr; 20(2):83-7.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Outbreaks of histoplasmosis have been increasingly reported in association with travel to endemic areas. Multiple outbreaks have been reported following travel to the Americas, but reports of pulmonary histoplasmosis in short-term immunocompetent travelers to Africa are rare.

METHODS

A biology student was referred to our unit with suspected pulmonary histoplasmosis following her return from a field trip in the Ugandan rainforest. The patient informed us that several of her multinational student colleagues on the same expedition had developed a similar illness. Using an alert in ProMED-mail and a questionnaire forwarded to each of the symptomatic students, we accumulated data on the other cases involved in this apparent outbreak of pulmonary histoplasmosis.

RESULTS

Thirteen of 24 students developed respiratory symptoms following the expedition. Chest X-ray appearances were often suggestive of miliary tuberculosis but in most cases a final diagnosis of histoplasmosis was made (confirmed with serology in five cases, clinically diagnosed in six, and retrospectively suspected in two). Detailed questioning indicated that the likely source was a large hollow bat-infested tree within the rainforest.

CONCLUSIONS

This is an unusual outbreak of histoplasmosis following short-term travel to Africa. Pulmonary histoplasmosis should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an acute febrile respiratory illness in travelers returning from endemic areas or reporting activities suggesting exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tropical and Infectious Disease Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. lucy.cottle@rlbuht.nhs.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23464714

Citation

Cottle, Lucy E., et al. "A Multinational Outbreak of Histoplasmosis Following a Biology Field Trip in the Ugandan Rainforest." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 20, no. 2, 2013, pp. 83-7.
Cottle LE, Gkrania-Klotsas E, Williams HJ, et al. A multinational outbreak of histoplasmosis following a biology field trip in the Ugandan rainforest. J Travel Med. 2013;20(2):83-7.
Cottle, L. E., Gkrania-Klotsas, E., Williams, H. J., Brindle, H. E., Carmichael, A. J., Fry, G., & Beeching, N. J. (2013). A multinational outbreak of histoplasmosis following a biology field trip in the Ugandan rainforest. Journal of Travel Medicine, 20(2), 83-7. https://doi.org/10.1111/jtm.12012
Cottle LE, et al. A Multinational Outbreak of Histoplasmosis Following a Biology Field Trip in the Ugandan Rainforest. J Travel Med. 2013 Mar-Apr;20(2):83-7. PubMed PMID: 23464714.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A multinational outbreak of histoplasmosis following a biology field trip in the Ugandan rainforest. AU - Cottle,Lucy E, AU - Gkrania-Klotsas,Effrossyni, AU - Williams,Hannah J, AU - Brindle,Hannah E, AU - Carmichael,Andrew J, AU - Fry,Graham, AU - Beeching,Nicholas J, Y1 - 2013/01/30/ PY - 2012/06/21/received PY - 2012/11/17/revised PY - 2012/11/19/accepted PY - 2013/3/8/entrez PY - 2013/3/8/pubmed PY - 2013/8/29/medline SP - 83 EP - 7 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of histoplasmosis have been increasingly reported in association with travel to endemic areas. Multiple outbreaks have been reported following travel to the Americas, but reports of pulmonary histoplasmosis in short-term immunocompetent travelers to Africa are rare. METHODS: A biology student was referred to our unit with suspected pulmonary histoplasmosis following her return from a field trip in the Ugandan rainforest. The patient informed us that several of her multinational student colleagues on the same expedition had developed a similar illness. Using an alert in ProMED-mail and a questionnaire forwarded to each of the symptomatic students, we accumulated data on the other cases involved in this apparent outbreak of pulmonary histoplasmosis. RESULTS: Thirteen of 24 students developed respiratory symptoms following the expedition. Chest X-ray appearances were often suggestive of miliary tuberculosis but in most cases a final diagnosis of histoplasmosis was made (confirmed with serology in five cases, clinically diagnosed in six, and retrospectively suspected in two). Detailed questioning indicated that the likely source was a large hollow bat-infested tree within the rainforest. CONCLUSIONS: This is an unusual outbreak of histoplasmosis following short-term travel to Africa. Pulmonary histoplasmosis should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an acute febrile respiratory illness in travelers returning from endemic areas or reporting activities suggesting exposure. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23464714/A_multinational_outbreak_of_histoplasmosis_following_a_biology_field_trip_in_the_Ugandan_rainforest_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/jtm.12012 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -