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Chronic kidney disease: mineral and bone disorder in children.
Semin Nephrol. 2013 Mar; 33(2):169-79.SN

Abstract

Childhood and adolescence are crucial times for the development of a healthy skeletal and cardiovascular system. Disordered mineral and bone metabolism accompany chronic kidney disease (CKD) and present significant obstacles to optimal bone strength, final adult height, and cardiovascular health. Early increases in bone and plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are associated with early defects in skeletal mineralization. Later in the course of CKD, secondary hyperparathyroidism--caused by a combination of declining calcitriol values and phosphate retention--results in high-turnover renal osteodystrophy whereas increased levels of both phosphate and FGF23 contribute to cardiovascular disease. Treatment of hyperphosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism improves high-turnover bone disease but fails to correct defects in skeletal mineralization. Because overtreatment may result in adynamic bone disease, growth failure, hypercalcemia, and progression of cardiovascular calcifications, therapy therefore must be titrated carefully to maintain optimal serum biochemical parameters according to stage of CKD. Newer therapeutic agents and new treatment paradigms may suppress serum PTH levels effectively while limiting intestinal calcium absorption and skeletal FGF23 stimulation and may provide future therapeutic alternatives for children with CKD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. kwesseling@mednet.ucla.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23465503

Citation

Wesseling-Perry, Katherine, and Isidro B. Salusky. "Chronic Kidney Disease: Mineral and Bone Disorder in Children." Seminars in Nephrology, vol. 33, no. 2, 2013, pp. 169-79.
Wesseling-Perry K, Salusky IB. Chronic kidney disease: mineral and bone disorder in children. Semin Nephrol. 2013;33(2):169-79.
Wesseling-Perry, K., & Salusky, I. B. (2013). Chronic kidney disease: mineral and bone disorder in children. Seminars in Nephrology, 33(2), 169-79. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2012.12.017
Wesseling-Perry K, Salusky IB. Chronic Kidney Disease: Mineral and Bone Disorder in Children. Semin Nephrol. 2013;33(2):169-79. PubMed PMID: 23465503.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chronic kidney disease: mineral and bone disorder in children. AU - Wesseling-Perry,Katherine, AU - Salusky,Isidro B, PY - 2013/3/8/entrez PY - 2013/3/8/pubmed PY - 2013/8/28/medline SP - 169 EP - 79 JF - Seminars in nephrology JO - Semin Nephrol VL - 33 IS - 2 N2 - Childhood and adolescence are crucial times for the development of a healthy skeletal and cardiovascular system. Disordered mineral and bone metabolism accompany chronic kidney disease (CKD) and present significant obstacles to optimal bone strength, final adult height, and cardiovascular health. Early increases in bone and plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are associated with early defects in skeletal mineralization. Later in the course of CKD, secondary hyperparathyroidism--caused by a combination of declining calcitriol values and phosphate retention--results in high-turnover renal osteodystrophy whereas increased levels of both phosphate and FGF23 contribute to cardiovascular disease. Treatment of hyperphosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism improves high-turnover bone disease but fails to correct defects in skeletal mineralization. Because overtreatment may result in adynamic bone disease, growth failure, hypercalcemia, and progression of cardiovascular calcifications, therapy therefore must be titrated carefully to maintain optimal serum biochemical parameters according to stage of CKD. Newer therapeutic agents and new treatment paradigms may suppress serum PTH levels effectively while limiting intestinal calcium absorption and skeletal FGF23 stimulation and may provide future therapeutic alternatives for children with CKD. SN - 1558-4488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23465503/Chronic_kidney_disease:_mineral_and_bone_disorder_in_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0270-9295(12)00279-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -