Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Medical students' subjective ratings of stress levels and awareness of student support services about mental health.
Postgrad Med J. 2013 Jun; 89(1052):311-5.PM

Abstract

PURPOSE

To descriptively assess medical students' concerns for their mental and emotional state, perceived need to conceal mental problems, perceived level of support at university, knowledge and use of student support services, and experience of stresses of daily life.

STUDY DESIGN

From March to September 2011, medical students at an Australian university were invited to complete an anonymous online survey.

RESULTS

475 responses were received. Students rated study and examinations (48.9%), financial concerns (38.1%), isolation (19.4%) and relationship concerns (19.2%) as very or extremely stressful issues. Knowledge of available support services was high, with 90.8% indicating they were aware of the university's medical centre. Treatment rates were modest (31.7%). Students' concerns about their mental state were generally low, but one in five strongly felt they needed to conceal their emotional problems.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite widespread awareness of appropriate support services, a large proportion of students felt they needed to conceal mental and emotional problems. Overall treatment rates for students who were greatly concerned about their mental and emotional state appeared modest, and, although comparable with those of similarly aged community populations, may reflect undertreatment. It would be appropriate for universities to address stressors identified by students. Strategies for encouraging distressed students to obtain appropriate assessment and treatment should also be explored. Those students who do seek healthcare are most likely to see a primary care physician, suggesting an important screening role for these health professionals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Discipline of Psychiatry, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23468555

Citation

Walter, Garry, et al. "Medical Students' Subjective Ratings of Stress Levels and Awareness of Student Support Services About Mental Health." Postgraduate Medical Journal, vol. 89, no. 1052, 2013, pp. 311-5.
Walter G, Soh NL, Norgren Jaconelli S, et al. Medical students' subjective ratings of stress levels and awareness of student support services about mental health. Postgrad Med J. 2013;89(1052):311-5.
Walter, G., Soh, N. L., Norgren Jaconelli, S., Lampe, L., Malhi, G. S., & Hunt, G. (2013). Medical students' subjective ratings of stress levels and awareness of student support services about mental health. Postgraduate Medical Journal, 89(1052), 311-5. https://doi.org/10.1136/postgradmedj-2012-131343
Walter G, et al. Medical Students' Subjective Ratings of Stress Levels and Awareness of Student Support Services About Mental Health. Postgrad Med J. 2013;89(1052):311-5. PubMed PMID: 23468555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medical students' subjective ratings of stress levels and awareness of student support services about mental health. AU - Walter,Garry, AU - Soh,Nerissa Li-Wey, AU - Norgren Jaconelli,Sanna, AU - Lampe,Lisa, AU - Malhi,Gin S, AU - Hunt,Glenn, Y1 - 2013/03/06/ PY - 2013/3/8/entrez PY - 2013/3/8/pubmed PY - 2014/1/15/medline KW - MEDICAL EDUCATION & TRAINING KW - MENTAL HEALTH KW - PSYCHIATRY SP - 311 EP - 5 JF - Postgraduate medical journal JO - Postgrad Med J VL - 89 IS - 1052 N2 - PURPOSE: To descriptively assess medical students' concerns for their mental and emotional state, perceived need to conceal mental problems, perceived level of support at university, knowledge and use of student support services, and experience of stresses of daily life. STUDY DESIGN: From March to September 2011, medical students at an Australian university were invited to complete an anonymous online survey. RESULTS: 475 responses were received. Students rated study and examinations (48.9%), financial concerns (38.1%), isolation (19.4%) and relationship concerns (19.2%) as very or extremely stressful issues. Knowledge of available support services was high, with 90.8% indicating they were aware of the university's medical centre. Treatment rates were modest (31.7%). Students' concerns about their mental state were generally low, but one in five strongly felt they needed to conceal their emotional problems. CONCLUSIONS: Despite widespread awareness of appropriate support services, a large proportion of students felt they needed to conceal mental and emotional problems. Overall treatment rates for students who were greatly concerned about their mental and emotional state appeared modest, and, although comparable with those of similarly aged community populations, may reflect undertreatment. It would be appropriate for universities to address stressors identified by students. Strategies for encouraging distressed students to obtain appropriate assessment and treatment should also be explored. Those students who do seek healthcare are most likely to see a primary care physician, suggesting an important screening role for these health professionals. SN - 1469-0756 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23468555/Medical_students'_subjective_ratings_of_stress_levels_and_awareness_of_student_support_services_about_mental_health_ L2 - https://pmj.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=23468555 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -