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The association between IgG4 antibodies to dietary factors, islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young.
PLoS One 2013; 8(2):e57936Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Infant dietary exposures have been linked to type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. IgG4 antibody responses to food antigens are associated with food intolerances but have not been explored prospectively in the period preceding T1D.

METHODS

Using a case-cohort design, IgG4 antibodies to β-lactoglobulin, gluten, and ovalbumin were measured in plasma collected annually from 260 DAISY participants. Of those, 77 developed islet autoimmunity (IA), defined as positive for either insulin, GAD65 or IA-2 autoantibodies on two consecutive visits, and 22 developed T1D.

RESULTS

In mixed model analysis adjusting for HLA-DR status, T1D family history, age and ethnicity, higher β-lactoglobulin IgG4 concentrations were associated with shorter breastfeeding duration (beta = -0.03, 95% Confidence Interval: -0.05, -0.006) and earlier first cow's milk exposure (beta = -0.04, 95% Confidence Interval: -0.08, 0.00). Higher gluten IgG4 was associated with older age at gluten introduction (beta = 0.06, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.00, 0.13). In proportional hazards analysis adjusting for HLA-DR status, T1D family history and ethnicity, IgG4 against individual or multiple dietary antigens throughout childhood were not associated with IA. In addition, mean antigen-specific IgG4 concentrations in infancy (age <2 years) were not associated with risk of IA nor progression to T1D. Higher ovalbumin IgG4 at first IA positive visit was marginally associated with progression to T1D (Hazard Ratio: 1.39, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.00, 1.92).

CONCLUSION

We found no association between the IgG4 response to β-lactoglobulin, gluten, and the development of either IA or T1D. The association between higher ovalbumin and progression to T1D in children with IA should be explored in other populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, United States of America.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23469110

Citation

Lamb, Molly M., et al. "The Association Between IgG4 Antibodies to Dietary Factors, Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 2, 2013, pp. e57936.
Lamb MM, Simpson MD, Seifert J, et al. The association between IgG4 antibodies to dietary factors, islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(2):e57936.
Lamb, M. M., Simpson, M. D., Seifert, J., Scott, F. W., Rewers, M., & Norris, J. M. (2013). The association between IgG4 antibodies to dietary factors, islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. PloS One, 8(2), pp. e57936. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0057936.
Lamb MM, et al. The Association Between IgG4 Antibodies to Dietary Factors, Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(2):e57936. PubMed PMID: 23469110.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association between IgG4 antibodies to dietary factors, islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. AU - Lamb,Molly M, AU - Simpson,Melissa D, AU - Seifert,Jennifer, AU - Scott,Fraser W, AU - Rewers,Marian, AU - Norris,Jill M, Y1 - 2013/02/28/ PY - 2012/09/26/received PY - 2013/01/29/accepted PY - 2013/3/8/entrez PY - 2013/3/8/pubmed PY - 2013/8/30/medline SP - e57936 EP - e57936 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Infant dietary exposures have been linked to type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. IgG4 antibody responses to food antigens are associated with food intolerances but have not been explored prospectively in the period preceding T1D. METHODS: Using a case-cohort design, IgG4 antibodies to β-lactoglobulin, gluten, and ovalbumin were measured in plasma collected annually from 260 DAISY participants. Of those, 77 developed islet autoimmunity (IA), defined as positive for either insulin, GAD65 or IA-2 autoantibodies on two consecutive visits, and 22 developed T1D. RESULTS: In mixed model analysis adjusting for HLA-DR status, T1D family history, age and ethnicity, higher β-lactoglobulin IgG4 concentrations were associated with shorter breastfeeding duration (beta = -0.03, 95% Confidence Interval: -0.05, -0.006) and earlier first cow's milk exposure (beta = -0.04, 95% Confidence Interval: -0.08, 0.00). Higher gluten IgG4 was associated with older age at gluten introduction (beta = 0.06, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.00, 0.13). In proportional hazards analysis adjusting for HLA-DR status, T1D family history and ethnicity, IgG4 against individual or multiple dietary antigens throughout childhood were not associated with IA. In addition, mean antigen-specific IgG4 concentrations in infancy (age <2 years) were not associated with risk of IA nor progression to T1D. Higher ovalbumin IgG4 at first IA positive visit was marginally associated with progression to T1D (Hazard Ratio: 1.39, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.00, 1.92). CONCLUSION: We found no association between the IgG4 response to β-lactoglobulin, gluten, and the development of either IA or T1D. The association between higher ovalbumin and progression to T1D in children with IA should be explored in other populations. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23469110/The_association_between_IgG4_antibodies_to_dietary_factors_islet_autoimmunity_and_type_1_diabetes:_the_Diabetes_Autoimmunity_Study_in_the_Young_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0057936 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -