Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fish intake during pregnancy and the risk of child asthma and allergic rhinitis - longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort.
Br J Nutr. 2013 Oct; 110(7):1313-25.BJ

Abstract

Maternal fish intake during pregnancy may influence the risk of child asthma and allergic rhinitis, yet evidence is conflicting on its association with these outcomes. We examined the associations of maternal fish intake during pregnancy with child asthma and allergic rhinitis. Mothers in the Danish National Birth Cohort (n 28 936) reported their fish intake at 12 and 30 weeks of gestation. Using multivariate logistic regression, we examined the associations of fish intake with child wheeze, asthma and rhinitis assessed at several time points: ever wheeze, recurrent wheeze (>3 episodes), ever asthma and allergic rhinitis, and current asthma, assessed at 18 months (n approximately 22,000) and 7 years (n approximately 17,000) using self-report and registry data on hospitalisations and prescribed medications. Compared with consistently high fish intake during pregnancy (fish as a sandwich or hot meal > or equal to 2-3 times/week), never eating fish was associated with a higher risk of child asthma diagnosis at 18 months (OR 1·30, 95% CI 1·05, 1·63, P=0·02), and ever asthma by hospitalisation (OR 1·46, 95% CI 0·99, 2·13, P=0·05) and medication prescription (OR 1·37, 95% CI 1·10, 1·71, P=0·01). A dose-response was present for asthma at 18 months only (P for trend=0·001). We found no associations with wheeze or recurrent wheeze at 18 months or with allergic rhinitis. The results suggest that high (v. no) maternal fish intake during pregnancy is protective against both early and ever asthma in 7-year-old children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, 2300 Copenhagen, Denmark.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23473120

Citation

Maslova, Ekaterina, et al. "Fish Intake During Pregnancy and the Risk of Child Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis - Longitudinal Evidence From the Danish National Birth Cohort." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 110, no. 7, 2013, pp. 1313-25.
Maslova E, Strøm M, Oken E, et al. Fish intake during pregnancy and the risk of child asthma and allergic rhinitis - longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Br J Nutr. 2013;110(7):1313-25.
Maslova, E., Strøm, M., Oken, E., Campos, H., Lange, C., Gold, D., & Olsen, S. F. (2013). Fish intake during pregnancy and the risk of child asthma and allergic rhinitis - longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort. The British Journal of Nutrition, 110(7), 1313-25. https://doi.org/10.1017/S000711451300038X
Maslova E, et al. Fish Intake During Pregnancy and the Risk of Child Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis - Longitudinal Evidence From the Danish National Birth Cohort. Br J Nutr. 2013;110(7):1313-25. PubMed PMID: 23473120.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish intake during pregnancy and the risk of child asthma and allergic rhinitis - longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort. AU - Maslova,Ekaterina, AU - Strøm,Marin, AU - Oken,Emily, AU - Campos,Hannia, AU - Lange,Christoph, AU - Gold,Diane, AU - Olsen,Sjurdur F, Y1 - 2013/03/08/ PY - 2013/3/12/entrez PY - 2013/3/12/pubmed PY - 2013/11/16/medline SP - 1313 EP - 25 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 110 IS - 7 N2 - Maternal fish intake during pregnancy may influence the risk of child asthma and allergic rhinitis, yet evidence is conflicting on its association with these outcomes. We examined the associations of maternal fish intake during pregnancy with child asthma and allergic rhinitis. Mothers in the Danish National Birth Cohort (n 28 936) reported their fish intake at 12 and 30 weeks of gestation. Using multivariate logistic regression, we examined the associations of fish intake with child wheeze, asthma and rhinitis assessed at several time points: ever wheeze, recurrent wheeze (>3 episodes), ever asthma and allergic rhinitis, and current asthma, assessed at 18 months (n approximately 22,000) and 7 years (n approximately 17,000) using self-report and registry data on hospitalisations and prescribed medications. Compared with consistently high fish intake during pregnancy (fish as a sandwich or hot meal > or equal to 2-3 times/week), never eating fish was associated with a higher risk of child asthma diagnosis at 18 months (OR 1·30, 95% CI 1·05, 1·63, P=0·02), and ever asthma by hospitalisation (OR 1·46, 95% CI 0·99, 2·13, P=0·05) and medication prescription (OR 1·37, 95% CI 1·10, 1·71, P=0·01). A dose-response was present for asthma at 18 months only (P for trend=0·001). We found no associations with wheeze or recurrent wheeze at 18 months or with allergic rhinitis. The results suggest that high (v. no) maternal fish intake during pregnancy is protective against both early and ever asthma in 7-year-old children. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23473120/Fish_intake_during_pregnancy_and_the_risk_of_child_asthma_and_allergic_rhinitis___longitudinal_evidence_from_the_Danish_National_Birth_Cohort_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S000711451300038X/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -