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Not all sounds sound the same: Parkinson's disease affects differently emotion processing in music and in speech prosody.
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2013; 35(4):373-92.JC

Abstract

Does emotion processing in music and speech prosody recruit common neurocognitive mechanisms? To examine this question, we implemented a cross-domain comparative design in Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty-four patients and 25 controls performed emotion recognition tasks for music and spoken sentences. In music, patients had impaired recognition of happiness and peacefulness, and intact recognition of sadness and fear; this pattern was independent of general cognitive and perceptual abilities. In speech, patients had a small global impairment, which was significantly mediated by executive dysfunction. Hence, PD affected differently musical and prosodic emotions. This dissociation indicates that the mechanisms underlying the two domains are partly independent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23477505

Citation

Lima, César F., et al. "Not All Sounds Sound the Same: Parkinson's Disease Affects Differently Emotion Processing in Music and in Speech Prosody." Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, vol. 35, no. 4, 2013, pp. 373-92.
Lima CF, Garrett C, Castro SL. Not all sounds sound the same: Parkinson's disease affects differently emotion processing in music and in speech prosody. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2013;35(4):373-92.
Lima, C. F., Garrett, C., & Castro, S. L. (2013). Not all sounds sound the same: Parkinson's disease affects differently emotion processing in music and in speech prosody. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 35(4), 373-92. https://doi.org/10.1080/13803395.2013.776518
Lima CF, Garrett C, Castro SL. Not All Sounds Sound the Same: Parkinson's Disease Affects Differently Emotion Processing in Music and in Speech Prosody. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2013;35(4):373-92. PubMed PMID: 23477505.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Not all sounds sound the same: Parkinson's disease affects differently emotion processing in music and in speech prosody. AU - Lima,César F, AU - Garrett,Carolina, AU - Castro,São Luís, Y1 - 2013/03/12/ PY - 2013/3/13/entrez PY - 2013/3/13/pubmed PY - 2014/1/23/medline SP - 373 EP - 92 JF - Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology JO - J Clin Exp Neuropsychol VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - Does emotion processing in music and speech prosody recruit common neurocognitive mechanisms? To examine this question, we implemented a cross-domain comparative design in Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty-four patients and 25 controls performed emotion recognition tasks for music and spoken sentences. In music, patients had impaired recognition of happiness and peacefulness, and intact recognition of sadness and fear; this pattern was independent of general cognitive and perceptual abilities. In speech, patients had a small global impairment, which was significantly mediated by executive dysfunction. Hence, PD affected differently musical and prosodic emotions. This dissociation indicates that the mechanisms underlying the two domains are partly independent. SN - 1744-411X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23477505/Not_all_sounds_sound_the_same:_Parkinson's_disease_affects_differently_emotion_processing_in_music_and_in_speech_prosody_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13803395.2013.776518 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -