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Trans fatty acid intake is associated with increased risk and n3 fatty acid intake with reduced risk of non-hodgkin lymphoma.

Abstract

We evaluated the association of dietary fat and protein intake with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in a clinic-based study in 603 cases (including 218 chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, 146 follicular lymphoma, and 105 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) and 1007 frequency-matched controls. Usual diet was assessed with a 128-item food-frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs, and polytomous logistic regression was used to assess subtype-specific risks. trans Fatty acid (TFA) intake was positively associated with NHL risk [OR = 1.60 for highest vs. lowest quartile (95% CI = 1.18, 2.15); P-trend = 0.0014], n3 (ω3) fatty acid intake was inversely associated with risk [OR = 0.48 (95% CI = 0.35, 0.65); P-trend < 0.0001], and there was no association with total, animal, plant-based, or saturated fat intake. When examining intake of specific foods, processed meat [OR = 1.37 (95% CI = 1.02, 1.83); P-trend = 0.03], milk containing any fat [OR = 1.47 (95% CI = 1.16, 1.88); P-trend = 0.0025], and high-fat ice cream [OR = 4.03 (95% CI = 2.80, 5.80); P-trend < 0.0001], intakes were positively associated with risk, whereas intakes of fresh fish and total seafood [OR = 0.61 (95% CI = 0.46, 0.80); P-trend = 0.0025] were inversely associated with risk. Overall, there was little evidence for NHL subtype-specific heterogeneity. In conclusion, diets high in TFAs, processed meats, and higher fat dairy products were positively associated with NHL risk, whereas diets high in n3 fatty acids and total seafood were inversely associated with risk.

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    Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

    , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 143:5 2013 May pg 672-81

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Case-Control Studies
    Confidence Intervals
    Diet
    Diet Surveys
    Dietary Fats
    Fatty Acids, Omega-3
    Female
    Humans
    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell
    Leukemia, Lymphoid
    Logistic Models
    Lymphoma, B-Cell
    Lymphoma, Follicular
    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Trans Fatty Acids

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23486982

    Citation

    Charbonneau, Bridget, et al. "Trans Fatty Acid Intake Is Associated With Increased Risk and N3 Fatty Acid Intake With Reduced Risk of Non-hodgkin Lymphoma." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 5, 2013, pp. 672-81.
    Charbonneau B, O'Connor HM, Wang AH, et al. Trans fatty acid intake is associated with increased risk and n3 fatty acid intake with reduced risk of non-hodgkin lymphoma. J Nutr. 2013;143(5):672-81.
    Charbonneau, B., O'Connor, H. M., Wang, A. H., Liebow, M., Thompson, C. A., Fredericksen, Z. S., ... Cerhan, J. R. (2013). Trans fatty acid intake is associated with increased risk and n3 fatty acid intake with reduced risk of non-hodgkin lymphoma. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(5), pp. 672-81. doi:10.3945/jn.112.168658.
    Charbonneau B, et al. Trans Fatty Acid Intake Is Associated With Increased Risk and N3 Fatty Acid Intake With Reduced Risk of Non-hodgkin Lymphoma. J Nutr. 2013;143(5):672-81. PubMed PMID: 23486982.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Trans fatty acid intake is associated with increased risk and n3 fatty acid intake with reduced risk of non-hodgkin lymphoma. AU - Charbonneau,Bridget, AU - O'Connor,Helen M, AU - Wang,Alice H, AU - Liebow,Mark, AU - Thompson,Carrie A, AU - Fredericksen,Zachary S, AU - Macon,William R, AU - Slager,Susan L, AU - Call,Timothy G, AU - Habermann,Thomas M, AU - Cerhan,James R, Y1 - 2013/03/13/ PY - 2013/3/15/entrez PY - 2013/3/15/pubmed PY - 2013/6/19/medline SP - 672 EP - 81 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 143 IS - 5 N2 - We evaluated the association of dietary fat and protein intake with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in a clinic-based study in 603 cases (including 218 chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, 146 follicular lymphoma, and 105 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) and 1007 frequency-matched controls. Usual diet was assessed with a 128-item food-frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs, and polytomous logistic regression was used to assess subtype-specific risks. trans Fatty acid (TFA) intake was positively associated with NHL risk [OR = 1.60 for highest vs. lowest quartile (95% CI = 1.18, 2.15); P-trend = 0.0014], n3 (ω3) fatty acid intake was inversely associated with risk [OR = 0.48 (95% CI = 0.35, 0.65); P-trend < 0.0001], and there was no association with total, animal, plant-based, or saturated fat intake. When examining intake of specific foods, processed meat [OR = 1.37 (95% CI = 1.02, 1.83); P-trend = 0.03], milk containing any fat [OR = 1.47 (95% CI = 1.16, 1.88); P-trend = 0.0025], and high-fat ice cream [OR = 4.03 (95% CI = 2.80, 5.80); P-trend < 0.0001], intakes were positively associated with risk, whereas intakes of fresh fish and total seafood [OR = 0.61 (95% CI = 0.46, 0.80); P-trend = 0.0025] were inversely associated with risk. Overall, there was little evidence for NHL subtype-specific heterogeneity. In conclusion, diets high in TFAs, processed meats, and higher fat dairy products were positively associated with NHL risk, whereas diets high in n3 fatty acids and total seafood were inversely associated with risk. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23486982/Trans_fatty_acid_intake_is_associated_with_increased_risk_and_n3_fatty_acid_intake_with_reduced_risk_of_non_hodgkin_lymphoma_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.168658 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -