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Involvement of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by ketamine.
Vet Anaesth Analg. 2013 Jul; 40(4):419-24.VA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the contribution of K(+) channels on peripheral antinociception induced by ketamine.

STUDY DESIGN

Prospective experimental study.

ANIMALS

110 male Wistar rats weighing 160-200 g.

METHODS

The paw pressure required to elicit limb flexion was designated as the nociceptive threshold. Hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 . All drugs were administered locally into the right hind paw of rats. Ketamine was administered into the right hind paw 2 hours and 55 minutes after local injection of PGE2 . Tetraethylammonium was administered 30 minutes prior to ketamine and the other K(+) channel blockers, glibenclamide, dequalinium and paxilline, were administered 5 minutes prior to ketamine.

RESULTS

Prostaglandin E2 (2 μg per paw) induced hyperalgesia. Ketamine (10, 20, 40 and 80 μg per paw) elicited a local peripheral antinociceptive effect that was antagonized by a specific blocker of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, glibenclamide (20, 40 and 80 μg per paw). In another experiment, the non-selective voltage-dependent K(+) channel blocker tetraethylammonium (30 μg per paw) and small and large conductance blockers of Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels, dequalinium (50 μg per paw) and paxilline (20 μg per paw), were ineffective at blocking the effect of a local ketamine injection.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Analysis of these results provides evidence that ketamine, may in part, induce peripheral antinociceptive effects by ATP-sensitive K(+) channel pathway activation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, ICB-UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23490455

Citation

Romero, Thiago R L., and Igor D G. Duarte. "Involvement of ATP-sensitive K(+) Channels in the Peripheral Antinociceptive Effect Induced By Ketamine." Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, vol. 40, no. 4, 2013, pp. 419-24.
Romero TR, Duarte ID. Involvement of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by ketamine. Vet Anaesth Analg. 2013;40(4):419-24.
Romero, T. R., & Duarte, I. D. (2013). Involvement of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by ketamine. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, 40(4), 419-24. https://doi.org/10.1111/vaa.12024
Romero TR, Duarte ID. Involvement of ATP-sensitive K(+) Channels in the Peripheral Antinociceptive Effect Induced By Ketamine. Vet Anaesth Analg. 2013;40(4):419-24. PubMed PMID: 23490455.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Involvement of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by ketamine. AU - Romero,Thiago R L, AU - Duarte,Igor D G, Y1 - 2013/03/13/ PY - 2011/01/09/received PY - 2012/05/29/accepted PY - 2013/3/16/entrez PY - 2013/3/16/pubmed PY - 2014/1/24/medline SP - 419 EP - 24 JF - Veterinary anaesthesia and analgesia JO - Vet Anaesth Analg VL - 40 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the contribution of K(+) channels on peripheral antinociception induced by ketamine. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective experimental study. ANIMALS: 110 male Wistar rats weighing 160-200 g. METHODS: The paw pressure required to elicit limb flexion was designated as the nociceptive threshold. Hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 . All drugs were administered locally into the right hind paw of rats. Ketamine was administered into the right hind paw 2 hours and 55 minutes after local injection of PGE2 . Tetraethylammonium was administered 30 minutes prior to ketamine and the other K(+) channel blockers, glibenclamide, dequalinium and paxilline, were administered 5 minutes prior to ketamine. RESULTS: Prostaglandin E2 (2 μg per paw) induced hyperalgesia. Ketamine (10, 20, 40 and 80 μg per paw) elicited a local peripheral antinociceptive effect that was antagonized by a specific blocker of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, glibenclamide (20, 40 and 80 μg per paw). In another experiment, the non-selective voltage-dependent K(+) channel blocker tetraethylammonium (30 μg per paw) and small and large conductance blockers of Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels, dequalinium (50 μg per paw) and paxilline (20 μg per paw), were ineffective at blocking the effect of a local ketamine injection. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Analysis of these results provides evidence that ketamine, may in part, induce peripheral antinociceptive effects by ATP-sensitive K(+) channel pathway activation. SN - 1467-2995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23490455/Involvement_of_ATP_sensitive_K_+__channels_in_the_peripheral_antinociceptive_effect_induced_by_ketamine_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1467-2987(16)30288-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -