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Vitamin D levels appear to be normal in Danish patients attending secondary care for low back pain and a weak positive correlation between serum level Vitamin D and Modic changes was demonstrated: a cross-sectional cohort study of consecutive patients with non-specific low back pain.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013 Mar 04; 14:78.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hypovitaminosis D has previously been reported in both the general population, in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain, and in people with low back pain (LBP). Myopathy-related symptoms such as diffuse bone and muscle pain, weakness and paresthesia in the legs, have also been observed in people with non-specific LBP and associations with low levels of Vitamin D have been suggested. The objectives of this study were to investigate (1) Vitamin D levels in patients seeking care for LBP in a Danish out-patient secondary care setting, and (2) their possible relationship with myopathy-related symptoms, Body Mass Index (BMI), and Modic changes.

METHODS

A total of 152 consecutive patients with non-specific LBP participated in a cross-sectional study. Participants were recruited at The Spine Centre of Southern Denmark during springtime 2011. Individual serum levels of 25-Hydroxyvitamin-D were determined using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Information about symptoms, height, and weight were collected from electronic questionnaires completed by the participants. All patients had an MRI from which Modic changes were identified. Correlations between Vitamin D level and pain, paresthesia, weakness in the legs, BMI or Modic changes were described using correlation coefficients and odds ratios obtained from logistic regression.

RESULTS

Two-thirds of the included patients with LBP had normal Vitamin D levels of >50 nmol/L. No correlations were seen between Vitamin D deficiency and gender, age, back pain intensity, leg pain intensity, and duration of pain. Statistically significant, but low, correlation coefficients were found between Vitamin D levels and BMI as well as Modic changes. Low Vitamin D levels and Modic changes were statistically significantly associated with an odds ratio of 0.30 (95% CI 0.12; 0.75) while weakness, paresthesia and widespread pain were not.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients seeking care for low back pain in a Danish outpatient clinic, Vitamin D deficiency was not common. Whether patients who are overweight or who have Modic changes might represent subgroups of people for whom their LBP may be associated with Vitamin D levels, needs further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Unit, Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Part of Clinical Locomotion Network, Hospital Lillebaelt, Institute of Regional Health Services, University of Southern Denmark, Oestre Hougvej 55, Middelfart, DK-5500, Denmark. jannick.vaaben.johansen@rsyd.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23497097

Citation

Johansen, Jannick Vaaben, et al. "Vitamin D Levels Appear to Be Normal in Danish Patients Attending Secondary Care for Low Back Pain and a Weak Positive Correlation Between Serum Level Vitamin D and Modic Changes Was Demonstrated: a Cross-sectional Cohort Study of Consecutive Patients With Non-specific Low Back Pain." BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, vol. 14, 2013, p. 78.
Johansen JV, Manniche C, Kjaer P. Vitamin D levels appear to be normal in Danish patients attending secondary care for low back pain and a weak positive correlation between serum level Vitamin D and Modic changes was demonstrated: a cross-sectional cohort study of consecutive patients with non-specific low back pain. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:78.
Johansen, J. V., Manniche, C., & Kjaer, P. (2013). Vitamin D levels appear to be normal in Danish patients attending secondary care for low back pain and a weak positive correlation between serum level Vitamin D and Modic changes was demonstrated: a cross-sectional cohort study of consecutive patients with non-specific low back pain. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 14, 78. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-14-78
Johansen JV, Manniche C, Kjaer P. Vitamin D Levels Appear to Be Normal in Danish Patients Attending Secondary Care for Low Back Pain and a Weak Positive Correlation Between Serum Level Vitamin D and Modic Changes Was Demonstrated: a Cross-sectional Cohort Study of Consecutive Patients With Non-specific Low Back Pain. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013 Mar 4;14:78. PubMed PMID: 23497097.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D levels appear to be normal in Danish patients attending secondary care for low back pain and a weak positive correlation between serum level Vitamin D and Modic changes was demonstrated: a cross-sectional cohort study of consecutive patients with non-specific low back pain. AU - Johansen,Jannick Vaaben, AU - Manniche,Claus, AU - Kjaer,Per, Y1 - 2013/03/04/ PY - 2012/11/14/received PY - 2013/02/26/accepted PY - 2013/3/19/entrez PY - 2013/3/19/pubmed PY - 2013/6/13/medline SP - 78 EP - 78 JF - BMC musculoskeletal disorders JO - BMC Musculoskelet Disord VL - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hypovitaminosis D has previously been reported in both the general population, in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain, and in people with low back pain (LBP). Myopathy-related symptoms such as diffuse bone and muscle pain, weakness and paresthesia in the legs, have also been observed in people with non-specific LBP and associations with low levels of Vitamin D have been suggested. The objectives of this study were to investigate (1) Vitamin D levels in patients seeking care for LBP in a Danish out-patient secondary care setting, and (2) their possible relationship with myopathy-related symptoms, Body Mass Index (BMI), and Modic changes. METHODS: A total of 152 consecutive patients with non-specific LBP participated in a cross-sectional study. Participants were recruited at The Spine Centre of Southern Denmark during springtime 2011. Individual serum levels of 25-Hydroxyvitamin-D were determined using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Information about symptoms, height, and weight were collected from electronic questionnaires completed by the participants. All patients had an MRI from which Modic changes were identified. Correlations between Vitamin D level and pain, paresthesia, weakness in the legs, BMI or Modic changes were described using correlation coefficients and odds ratios obtained from logistic regression. RESULTS: Two-thirds of the included patients with LBP had normal Vitamin D levels of >50 nmol/L. No correlations were seen between Vitamin D deficiency and gender, age, back pain intensity, leg pain intensity, and duration of pain. Statistically significant, but low, correlation coefficients were found between Vitamin D levels and BMI as well as Modic changes. Low Vitamin D levels and Modic changes were statistically significantly associated with an odds ratio of 0.30 (95% CI 0.12; 0.75) while weakness, paresthesia and widespread pain were not. CONCLUSIONS: In patients seeking care for low back pain in a Danish outpatient clinic, Vitamin D deficiency was not common. Whether patients who are overweight or who have Modic changes might represent subgroups of people for whom their LBP may be associated with Vitamin D levels, needs further investigation. SN - 1471-2474 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23497097/Vitamin_D_levels_appear_to_be_normal_in_Danish_patients_attending_secondary_care_for_low_back_pain_and_a_weak_positive_correlation_between_serum_level_Vitamin_D_and_Modic_changes_was_demonstrated:_a_cross_sectional_cohort_study_of_consecutive_patients_with_non_specific_low_back_pain_ L2 - https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2474-14-78 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -