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gSG6-P1 salivary biomarker discriminates micro-geographical heterogeneity of human exposure to Anopheles bites in low and seasonal malaria areas.
Parasit Vectors. 2013 Mar 15; 6:68.PV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Over the past decade, a sharp decline of malaria burden has been observed in several countries. Consequently, the conventional entomological methods have become insufficiently sensitive and probably under-estimate micro-geographical heterogeneity of exposure and subsequent risk of malaria transmission. In this study, we investigated whether the human antibody (Ab) response to Anopheles salivary gSG6-P1 peptide, known as a biomarker of Anopheles exposure, could be a sensitive and reliable tool for discriminating human exposure to Anopheles bites in area of low and seasonal malaria transmission.

METHODS

A multi-disciplinary survey was performed in Northern Senegal where An. gambiae s.l. is the main malaria vector. Human IgG Ab response to gSG6-P1 salivary peptide was compared according to the season and villages in children from five villages in the middle Senegal River valley, known as a low malaria transmission area.

RESULTS

IgG levels to gSG6-P1 varied considerably according to the villages, discriminating the heterogeneity of Anopheles exposure between villages. Significant increase of IgG levels to gSG6-P1 was observed during the peak of exposure to Anopheles bites, and decreased immediately after the end of the exposure season. In addition, differences in the season-dependent specific IgG levels between villages were observed after the implementation of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets by The National Malaria Control Program in this area.

CONCLUSION

The gSG6-P1 salivary peptide seems to be a reliable tool to discriminate the micro-geographical heterogeneity of human exposure to Anopheles bites in areas of very low and seasonal malaria transmission. A biomarker such as this could also be used to monitor and evaluate the possible heterogeneous effectiveness of operational vector control programs in low-exposure areas.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre de Recherche Biomédicale (CRB) Espoir Pour La Santé, 269 Route de la corniche, Sor - BP: 226, Saint-Louis, Sénégal. andre.sagna@espoir-sante.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23497646

Citation

Sagna, André Barembaye, et al. "GSG6-P1 Salivary Biomarker Discriminates Micro-geographical Heterogeneity of Human Exposure to Anopheles Bites in Low and Seasonal Malaria Areas." Parasites & Vectors, vol. 6, 2013, p. 68.
Sagna AB, Sarr JB, Gaayeb L, et al. GSG6-P1 salivary biomarker discriminates micro-geographical heterogeneity of human exposure to Anopheles bites in low and seasonal malaria areas. Parasit Vectors. 2013;6:68.
Sagna, A. B., Sarr, J. B., Gaayeb, L., Drame, P. M., Ndiath, M. O., Senghor, S., Sow, C. S., Poinsignon, A., Seck, M., Hermann, E., Schacht, A. M., Faye, N., Sokhna, C., Remoue, F., & Riveau, G. (2013). GSG6-P1 salivary biomarker discriminates micro-geographical heterogeneity of human exposure to Anopheles bites in low and seasonal malaria areas. Parasites & Vectors, 6, 68. https://doi.org/10.1186/1756-3305-6-68
Sagna AB, et al. GSG6-P1 Salivary Biomarker Discriminates Micro-geographical Heterogeneity of Human Exposure to Anopheles Bites in Low and Seasonal Malaria Areas. Parasit Vectors. 2013 Mar 15;6:68. PubMed PMID: 23497646.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - gSG6-P1 salivary biomarker discriminates micro-geographical heterogeneity of human exposure to Anopheles bites in low and seasonal malaria areas. AU - Sagna,André Barembaye, AU - Sarr,Jean Biram, AU - Gaayeb,Lobna, AU - Drame,Papa Makhtar, AU - Ndiath,Mamadou Ousmane, AU - Senghor,Simon, AU - Sow,Cheikh Saya, AU - Poinsignon,Anne, AU - Seck,Modou, AU - Hermann,Emmanuel, AU - Schacht,Anne-Marie, AU - Faye,Ngor, AU - Sokhna,Cheikh, AU - Remoue,Franck, AU - Riveau,Gilles, Y1 - 2013/03/15/ PY - 2012/12/10/received PY - 2013/03/08/accepted PY - 2013/3/19/entrez PY - 2013/3/19/pubmed PY - 2013/9/24/medline SP - 68 EP - 68 JF - Parasites & vectors JO - Parasit Vectors VL - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Over the past decade, a sharp decline of malaria burden has been observed in several countries. Consequently, the conventional entomological methods have become insufficiently sensitive and probably under-estimate micro-geographical heterogeneity of exposure and subsequent risk of malaria transmission. In this study, we investigated whether the human antibody (Ab) response to Anopheles salivary gSG6-P1 peptide, known as a biomarker of Anopheles exposure, could be a sensitive and reliable tool for discriminating human exposure to Anopheles bites in area of low and seasonal malaria transmission. METHODS: A multi-disciplinary survey was performed in Northern Senegal where An. gambiae s.l. is the main malaria vector. Human IgG Ab response to gSG6-P1 salivary peptide was compared according to the season and villages in children from five villages in the middle Senegal River valley, known as a low malaria transmission area. RESULTS: IgG levels to gSG6-P1 varied considerably according to the villages, discriminating the heterogeneity of Anopheles exposure between villages. Significant increase of IgG levels to gSG6-P1 was observed during the peak of exposure to Anopheles bites, and decreased immediately after the end of the exposure season. In addition, differences in the season-dependent specific IgG levels between villages were observed after the implementation of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets by The National Malaria Control Program in this area. CONCLUSION: The gSG6-P1 salivary peptide seems to be a reliable tool to discriminate the micro-geographical heterogeneity of human exposure to Anopheles bites in areas of very low and seasonal malaria transmission. A biomarker such as this could also be used to monitor and evaluate the possible heterogeneous effectiveness of operational vector control programs in low-exposure areas. SN - 1756-3305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23497646/gSG6_P1_salivary_biomarker_discriminates_micro_geographical_heterogeneity_of_human_exposure_to_Anopheles_bites_in_low_and_seasonal_malaria_areas_ L2 - https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1756-3305-6-68 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -