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Herbal hepatotoxicity: suspected cases assessed for alternative causes.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2013; 25(9):1093-8EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Alternative explanations are common in suspected drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and account for up to 47.1% of analyzed cases. This raised the question of whether a similar frequency may prevail in cases of assumed herb-induced liver injury (HILI).

METHODS

We searched the Medline database for the following terms: herbs, herbal drugs, herbal dietary supplements, hepatotoxic herbs, herbal hepatotoxicity, and herb-induced liver injury. Additional terms specifically addressed single herbs and herbal products: black cohosh, Greater Celandine, green tea, Herbalife products, Hydroxycut, kava, and Pelargonium sidoides. We retrieved 23 published case series and regulatory assessments related to hepatotoxicity by herbs and herbal dietary supplements with alternative causes.

RESULTS

The 23 publications comprised 573 cases of initially suspected HILI; alternative causes were evident in 278/573 cases (48.5%). Among them were hepatitis by various viruses (9.7%), autoimmune diseases (10.4%), nonalcoholic and alcoholic liver diseases (5.4%), liver injury by comedication (DILI and other HILI) (43.9%), and liver involvement in infectious diseases (4.7%). Biliary and pancreatic diseases were frequent alternative diagnoses (11.5%), raising therapeutic problems if specific treatment is withheld; pre-existing liver diseases including cirrhosis (9.7%) were additional confounding variables. Other diagnoses were rare, but possibly relevant for the individual patient.

CONCLUSION

In 573 cases of initially assumed HILI, 48.5% showed alternative causes unrelated to the initially incriminated herb, herbal drug, or herbal dietary supplement, calling for thorough clinical evaluations and appropriate causality assessments in future cases of suspected HILI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

aDepartment of Internal Medicine II, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Klinikum Hanau, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Medical Faculty bInstitute of Industrial, Environmental and Social Medicine, Medical Faculty, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main cDepartment of Medicine I, University Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23510966

Citation

Teschke, Rolf, et al. "Herbal Hepatotoxicity: Suspected Cases Assessed for Alternative Causes." European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, vol. 25, no. 9, 2013, pp. 1093-8.
Teschke R, Schulze J, Schwarzenboeck A, et al. Herbal hepatotoxicity: suspected cases assessed for alternative causes. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013;25(9):1093-8.
Teschke, R., Schulze, J., Schwarzenboeck, A., Eickhoff, A., & Frenzel, C. (2013). Herbal hepatotoxicity: suspected cases assessed for alternative causes. European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 25(9), pp. 1093-8. doi:10.1097/MEG.0b013e3283603e89.
Teschke R, et al. Herbal Hepatotoxicity: Suspected Cases Assessed for Alternative Causes. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013;25(9):1093-8. PubMed PMID: 23510966.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Herbal hepatotoxicity: suspected cases assessed for alternative causes. AU - Teschke,Rolf, AU - Schulze,Johannes, AU - Schwarzenboeck,Alexander, AU - Eickhoff,Axel, AU - Frenzel,Christian, PY - 2013/3/21/entrez PY - 2013/3/21/pubmed PY - 2014/8/5/medline SP - 1093 EP - 8 JF - European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology JO - Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 25 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Alternative explanations are common in suspected drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and account for up to 47.1% of analyzed cases. This raised the question of whether a similar frequency may prevail in cases of assumed herb-induced liver injury (HILI). METHODS: We searched the Medline database for the following terms: herbs, herbal drugs, herbal dietary supplements, hepatotoxic herbs, herbal hepatotoxicity, and herb-induced liver injury. Additional terms specifically addressed single herbs and herbal products: black cohosh, Greater Celandine, green tea, Herbalife products, Hydroxycut, kava, and Pelargonium sidoides. We retrieved 23 published case series and regulatory assessments related to hepatotoxicity by herbs and herbal dietary supplements with alternative causes. RESULTS: The 23 publications comprised 573 cases of initially suspected HILI; alternative causes were evident in 278/573 cases (48.5%). Among them were hepatitis by various viruses (9.7%), autoimmune diseases (10.4%), nonalcoholic and alcoholic liver diseases (5.4%), liver injury by comedication (DILI and other HILI) (43.9%), and liver involvement in infectious diseases (4.7%). Biliary and pancreatic diseases were frequent alternative diagnoses (11.5%), raising therapeutic problems if specific treatment is withheld; pre-existing liver diseases including cirrhosis (9.7%) were additional confounding variables. Other diagnoses were rare, but possibly relevant for the individual patient. CONCLUSION: In 573 cases of initially assumed HILI, 48.5% showed alternative causes unrelated to the initially incriminated herb, herbal drug, or herbal dietary supplement, calling for thorough clinical evaluations and appropriate causality assessments in future cases of suspected HILI. SN - 1473-5687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23510966/Herbal_hepatotoxicity:_suspected_cases_assessed_for_alternative_causes_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=23510966 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -