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Explaining the positive relationship between fourth-grade children's body mass index and energy intake at school-provided meals (breakfast and lunch).
J Sch Health. 2013 May; 83(5):328-34.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A 2010 publication showed a positive relationship between children's body mass index (BMI) and energy intake at school-provided meals (as assessed by direct meal observations). To help explain that relationship, we investigated 7 outcome variables concerning aspects of school-provided meals: energy content of items selected, number of meal components selected, number of meal components eaten, amounts eaten of standardized school-meal portions, energy intake from flavored milk, energy intake received in trades, and energy content given in trades.

METHODS

Fourth-grade children (N = 465) from Columbia, SC, were observed eating school-provided breakfast and lunch on 1 to 4 days per child. Researchers measured children's weight and height. For daily values at school meals, a generalized linear model was fit with BMI (dependent variable) and the 7 outcome variables, sex, and age (independent variables).

RESULTS

BMI was positively related to amounts eaten of standardized school-meal portions (p < .0001) and increased 8.45 kg/m(2) per serving, controlling for other variables in the model. BMI was positively related to energy intake from flavored milk (p = .0041) and increased 0.347 kg/m(2) for every 100 kcal consumed. BMI was negatively related to energy intake received in trades (p = .0003) and decreased 0.468 kg/m(2) for every 100 kcal received. BMI was not significantly related to 4 outcome variables.

CONCLUSIONS

Knowing that relationships between BMI and actual consumption, not selection, at school-provided meals explained the (previously found) positive relationship between BMI and energy intake at school-provided meals is helpful for school-based obesity interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Families in Society, University of South Carolina, 1600 Hampton Street, Suite 507, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. cguinn@mailbox.sc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23517000

Citation

Guinn, Caroline H., et al. "Explaining the Positive Relationship Between Fourth-grade Children's Body Mass Index and Energy Intake at School-provided Meals (breakfast and Lunch)." The Journal of School Health, vol. 83, no. 5, 2013, pp. 328-34.
Guinn CH, Baxter SD, Royer JA, et al. Explaining the positive relationship between fourth-grade children's body mass index and energy intake at school-provided meals (breakfast and lunch). J Sch Health. 2013;83(5):328-34.
Guinn, C. H., Baxter, S. D., Royer, J. A., & Hitchcock, D. B. (2013). Explaining the positive relationship between fourth-grade children's body mass index and energy intake at school-provided meals (breakfast and lunch). The Journal of School Health, 83(5), 328-34. https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12035
Guinn CH, et al. Explaining the Positive Relationship Between Fourth-grade Children's Body Mass Index and Energy Intake at School-provided Meals (breakfast and Lunch). J Sch Health. 2013;83(5):328-34. PubMed PMID: 23517000.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Explaining the positive relationship between fourth-grade children's body mass index and energy intake at school-provided meals (breakfast and lunch). AU - Guinn,Caroline H, AU - Baxter,Suzanne D, AU - Royer,Julie A, AU - Hitchcock,David B, PY - 2011/09/22/received PY - 2012/06/10/accepted PY - 2013/3/23/entrez PY - 2013/3/23/pubmed PY - 2013/9/17/medline SP - 328 EP - 34 JF - The Journal of school health JO - J Sch Health VL - 83 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: A 2010 publication showed a positive relationship between children's body mass index (BMI) and energy intake at school-provided meals (as assessed by direct meal observations). To help explain that relationship, we investigated 7 outcome variables concerning aspects of school-provided meals: energy content of items selected, number of meal components selected, number of meal components eaten, amounts eaten of standardized school-meal portions, energy intake from flavored milk, energy intake received in trades, and energy content given in trades. METHODS: Fourth-grade children (N = 465) from Columbia, SC, were observed eating school-provided breakfast and lunch on 1 to 4 days per child. Researchers measured children's weight and height. For daily values at school meals, a generalized linear model was fit with BMI (dependent variable) and the 7 outcome variables, sex, and age (independent variables). RESULTS: BMI was positively related to amounts eaten of standardized school-meal portions (p < .0001) and increased 8.45 kg/m(2) per serving, controlling for other variables in the model. BMI was positively related to energy intake from flavored milk (p = .0041) and increased 0.347 kg/m(2) for every 100 kcal consumed. BMI was negatively related to energy intake received in trades (p = .0003) and decreased 0.468 kg/m(2) for every 100 kcal received. BMI was not significantly related to 4 outcome variables. CONCLUSIONS: Knowing that relationships between BMI and actual consumption, not selection, at school-provided meals explained the (previously found) positive relationship between BMI and energy intake at school-provided meals is helpful for school-based obesity interventions. SN - 1746-1561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23517000/Explaining_the_positive_relationship_between_fourth_grade_children's_body_mass_index_and_energy_intake_at_school_provided_meals__breakfast_and_lunch__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12035 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -