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Dynamics of the continent-wide spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont.
Ecol Lett 2013; 16(5):609-16EL

Abstract

Facultative symbionts can represent important sources of adaptation for their insect hosts and thus have the potential for rapid spread. Drosophila neotestacea harbours a heritable symbiont, Spiroplasma, that confers protection against parasitic nematodes. We previously found a cline in Spiroplasma prevalence across central Canada, ending abruptly at the Rocky Mountains. Resampling these populations 9 years later revealed that Spiroplasma had increased substantially across the region, resembling a Fisherian wave of advance. Associations between Spiroplasma infection and host mitochondrial DNA indicate that the increase was due to local increase of Spiroplasma-infected flies. Finally, we detected Spiroplasma west of the Rocky Mountains for the first time and showed that defence against nematodes occurs in flies with a western genetic background. Because nematode infection is common throughout D. neotestacea's range, we expect Spiroplasma to spread to the Pacific coast.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, University of Victoria, PO Box 3020, Station CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W 3N5, Canada. stevep@uvic.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23517577

Citation

Cockburn, Sarah N., et al. "Dynamics of the Continent-wide Spread of a Drosophila Defensive Symbiont." Ecology Letters, vol. 16, no. 5, 2013, pp. 609-16.
Cockburn SN, Haselkorn TS, Hamilton PT, et al. Dynamics of the continent-wide spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont. Ecol Lett. 2013;16(5):609-16.
Cockburn, S. N., Haselkorn, T. S., Hamilton, P. T., Landzberg, E., Jaenike, J., & Perlman, S. J. (2013). Dynamics of the continent-wide spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont. Ecology Letters, 16(5), pp. 609-16. doi:10.1111/ele.12087.
Cockburn SN, et al. Dynamics of the Continent-wide Spread of a Drosophila Defensive Symbiont. Ecol Lett. 2013;16(5):609-16. PubMed PMID: 23517577.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dynamics of the continent-wide spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont. AU - Cockburn,Sarah N, AU - Haselkorn,Tamara S, AU - Hamilton,Phineas T, AU - Landzberg,Elizabeth, AU - Jaenike,John, AU - Perlman,Steve J, Y1 - 2013/03/12/ PY - 2012/11/15/received PY - 2012/12/15/revised PY - 2013/01/07/revised PY - 2013/01/12/accepted PY - 2013/3/23/entrez PY - 2013/3/23/pubmed PY - 2014/1/22/medline SP - 609 EP - 16 JF - Ecology letters JO - Ecol. Lett. VL - 16 IS - 5 N2 - Facultative symbionts can represent important sources of adaptation for their insect hosts and thus have the potential for rapid spread. Drosophila neotestacea harbours a heritable symbiont, Spiroplasma, that confers protection against parasitic nematodes. We previously found a cline in Spiroplasma prevalence across central Canada, ending abruptly at the Rocky Mountains. Resampling these populations 9 years later revealed that Spiroplasma had increased substantially across the region, resembling a Fisherian wave of advance. Associations between Spiroplasma infection and host mitochondrial DNA indicate that the increase was due to local increase of Spiroplasma-infected flies. Finally, we detected Spiroplasma west of the Rocky Mountains for the first time and showed that defence against nematodes occurs in flies with a western genetic background. Because nematode infection is common throughout D. neotestacea's range, we expect Spiroplasma to spread to the Pacific coast. SN - 1461-0248 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23517577/Dynamics_of_the_continent_wide_spread_of_a_Drosophila_defensive_symbiont_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12087 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -