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Oxytocin, feeding, and satiety.

Abstract

Oxytocin neurons have a physiological role in food intake and energy balance. Central administration of oxytocin is powerfully anorexigenic, reducing food intake and meal duration. The central mechanisms underlying this effect of oxytocin have become better understood in the past few years. Parvocellular neurons of the paraventricular nucleus project to the caudal brainstem to regulate feeding via autonomic functions including the gastrointestinal vago-vagal reflex. In contrast, magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei release oxytocin from their dendrites to diffuse to distant hypothalamic targets involved in satiety. The ventromedial hypothalamus, for example, expresses a high density of oxytocin receptors but does not contain detectable oxytocin nerve fibers. Magnocellular neurons represent targets for the anorexigenic neuropeptide α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. In addition to homeostatic control, oxytocin may also have a role in reward-related feeding. Evidence suggests that oxytocin can selectively suppress sugar intake and that it may have a role in limiting the intake of palatable food by inhibiting the reward pathway.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Integrative Physiology, School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Edinburgh Edinburgh, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23518828

Citation

Sabatier, Nancy, et al. "Oxytocin, Feeding, and Satiety." Frontiers in Endocrinology, vol. 4, 2013, p. 35.
Sabatier N, Leng G, Menzies J. Oxytocin, feeding, and satiety. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2013;4:35.
Sabatier, N., Leng, G., & Menzies, J. (2013). Oxytocin, feeding, and satiety. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 4, 35. https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2013.00035
Sabatier N, Leng G, Menzies J. Oxytocin, Feeding, and Satiety. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2013;4:35. PubMed PMID: 23518828.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oxytocin, feeding, and satiety. AU - Sabatier,Nancy, AU - Leng,Gareth, AU - Menzies,John, Y1 - 2013/03/20/ PY - 2012/10/02/received PY - 2013/03/05/accepted PY - 2013/3/23/entrez PY - 2013/3/23/pubmed PY - 2013/3/23/medline KW - appetite KW - food KW - oxytocin KW - reward KW - satiety SP - 35 EP - 35 JF - Frontiers in endocrinology JO - Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) VL - 4 N2 - Oxytocin neurons have a physiological role in food intake and energy balance. Central administration of oxytocin is powerfully anorexigenic, reducing food intake and meal duration. The central mechanisms underlying this effect of oxytocin have become better understood in the past few years. Parvocellular neurons of the paraventricular nucleus project to the caudal brainstem to regulate feeding via autonomic functions including the gastrointestinal vago-vagal reflex. In contrast, magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei release oxytocin from their dendrites to diffuse to distant hypothalamic targets involved in satiety. The ventromedial hypothalamus, for example, expresses a high density of oxytocin receptors but does not contain detectable oxytocin nerve fibers. Magnocellular neurons represent targets for the anorexigenic neuropeptide α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. In addition to homeostatic control, oxytocin may also have a role in reward-related feeding. Evidence suggests that oxytocin can selectively suppress sugar intake and that it may have a role in limiting the intake of palatable food by inhibiting the reward pathway. SN - 1664-2392 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23518828/Oxytocin_feeding_and_satiety_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2013.00035 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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