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Carbon dioxide laser endoscopic posterior cordotomy technique for bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis: a 15-year experience.
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013 Apr; 139(4):401-4.JO

Abstract

IMPORTANCE

Treatment of bilateral vocal cord paralysis is a considerable challenge for otolaryngologists. Many surgical techniques have been developed for the management of this entity to eliminate the need for tracheotomy.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the success of the unilateral carbon dioxide laser endoscopic posterior cordotomy technique for bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis.

DESIGN

A retrospective study.

SETTING

A university department of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery.

PARTICIPANTS

Sixty-six patients (58 women and 8 men) diagnosed as having bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis.

INTERVENTION

Endoscopic posterior cordotomy with the carbon dioxide laser.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Decannulation and postoperative voice quality and exercise tolerance.

RESULTS

The most common etiologic factor was recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis after thyroidectomy, observed in 61 patients (92%); an unknown cause was observed in 5 (8%). Unilateral cordotomy sufficed in 58 patients (88%). We performed revision procedures for vocal cord granuloma in 4 patients (6%). Bilateral cordotomy was required for 4 patients (6%) with an insufficient airway. Postoperative tracheotomy was needed for only 4 patients owing to the edema in the operation site. These patients underwent decannulation within a mean period of 7 days. No patient had poor postoperative exercise tolerance. We found no statistically significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative voice quality using the 10-item Turkish version of the Voice Handicap Index.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE

Carbon dioxide laser endoscopic posterior cordotomy is a safe, minimally invasive, effective technique with a short operation time. A bilateral approach or a revision procedure is rarely required. Bilateral cordotomy should be reserved for patients with insufficient airway passage with unilateral cordotomy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Çukurova University School of Medicine, Adana, Turkey. drsozdemir@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23519722

Citation

Özdemir, Süleyman, et al. "Carbon Dioxide Laser Endoscopic Posterior Cordotomy Technique for Bilateral Abductor Vocal Cord Paralysis: a 15-year Experience." JAMA Otolaryngology-- Head & Neck Surgery, vol. 139, no. 4, 2013, pp. 401-4.
Özdemir S, Tuncer Ü, Tarkan Ö, et al. Carbon dioxide laser endoscopic posterior cordotomy technique for bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis: a 15-year experience. JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013;139(4):401-4.
Özdemir, S., Tuncer, Ü., Tarkan, Ö., Kara, K., & Sürmelioğlu, Ö. (2013). Carbon dioxide laser endoscopic posterior cordotomy technique for bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis: a 15-year experience. JAMA Otolaryngology-- Head & Neck Surgery, 139(4), 401-4. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaoto.2013.41
Özdemir S, et al. Carbon Dioxide Laser Endoscopic Posterior Cordotomy Technique for Bilateral Abductor Vocal Cord Paralysis: a 15-year Experience. JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013;139(4):401-4. PubMed PMID: 23519722.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Carbon dioxide laser endoscopic posterior cordotomy technique for bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis: a 15-year experience. AU - Özdemir,Süleyman, AU - Tuncer,Ülkü, AU - Tarkan,Özgür, AU - Kara,Karahan, AU - Sürmelioğlu,Özgür, PY - 2013/3/23/entrez PY - 2013/3/23/pubmed PY - 2013/6/19/medline SP - 401 EP - 4 JF - JAMA otolaryngology-- head & neck surgery JO - JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg VL - 139 IS - 4 N2 - IMPORTANCE: Treatment of bilateral vocal cord paralysis is a considerable challenge for otolaryngologists. Many surgical techniques have been developed for the management of this entity to eliminate the need for tracheotomy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the success of the unilateral carbon dioxide laser endoscopic posterior cordotomy technique for bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis. DESIGN: A retrospective study. SETTING: A university department of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-six patients (58 women and 8 men) diagnosed as having bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis. INTERVENTION: Endoscopic posterior cordotomy with the carbon dioxide laser. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Decannulation and postoperative voice quality and exercise tolerance. RESULTS: The most common etiologic factor was recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis after thyroidectomy, observed in 61 patients (92%); an unknown cause was observed in 5 (8%). Unilateral cordotomy sufficed in 58 patients (88%). We performed revision procedures for vocal cord granuloma in 4 patients (6%). Bilateral cordotomy was required for 4 patients (6%) with an insufficient airway. Postoperative tracheotomy was needed for only 4 patients owing to the edema in the operation site. These patients underwent decannulation within a mean period of 7 days. No patient had poor postoperative exercise tolerance. We found no statistically significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative voice quality using the 10-item Turkish version of the Voice Handicap Index. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Carbon dioxide laser endoscopic posterior cordotomy is a safe, minimally invasive, effective technique with a short operation time. A bilateral approach or a revision procedure is rarely required. Bilateral cordotomy should be reserved for patients with insufficient airway passage with unilateral cordotomy. SN - 2168-619X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23519722/Carbon_dioxide_laser_endoscopic_posterior_cordotomy_technique_for_bilateral_abductor_vocal_cord_paralysis:_a_15_year_experience_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaoto.2013.41 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -