Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A review of trends in attrition rates for surgical faculty: a case for a sustainable retention strategy to cope with demographic and economic realities.
J Am Coll Surg. 2013 May; 216(5):944-53; discussion 953-4.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Our aim was to compare trends in retention of academic surgeons by reviewing surgical faculty attrition rates (leaving academic surgery for any reason) of 3 cohorts at 5-year intervals between 1996 and 2011.

STUDY DESIGN

The Association of American Medical Colleges' Faculty Administrative Management On-Line User System database was queried for a retention report of all tenure/clinical track full-time MD faculty within our academic medical center on July 1, 1996 (group 1), July 1, 2001 (group 2), and July 1, 2006 (group 3). Retention was tracked for 5 years post snapshot. The individual 5-year cohort attrition rates (observed frequencies) were compared with combined attrition rates for all 3 groups (expected frequencies).

RESULTS

Overall, attrition trends for groups 2 (lower) and 3 (higher) were significantly different than the trends for all groups combined. Minorities and professors at the full or associate rank in group 3 contributed to this difference. Faculty in group 3 leaving our academic medical center were significantly more likely to transition into nonacademic practice compared with the other 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Greater attrition in the last 5-year cohort, despite the increase in faculty positions, is worrisome. A continuous retention life cycle is critical if academic medical centers hope to compete for talent. Retention planning should include on-boarding programs for enculturation, monitoring of professional satisfaction, formalized mentoring of younger surgeons, retaining academic couples and a part-time workforce, leadership and talent management, exit interviews, and competitive financial packages.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, The Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University Hospital, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Bhagwan.satiani@osumc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23522787

Citation

Satiani, Bhagwan, et al. "A Review of Trends in Attrition Rates for Surgical Faculty: a Case for a Sustainable Retention Strategy to Cope With Demographic and Economic Realities." Journal of the American College of Surgeons, vol. 216, no. 5, 2013, pp. 944-53; discussion 953-4.
Satiani B, Williams TE, Brod H, et al. A review of trends in attrition rates for surgical faculty: a case for a sustainable retention strategy to cope with demographic and economic realities. J Am Coll Surg. 2013;216(5):944-53; discussion 953-4.
Satiani, B., Williams, T. E., Brod, H., Way, D. P., & Ellison, E. C. (2013). A review of trends in attrition rates for surgical faculty: a case for a sustainable retention strategy to cope with demographic and economic realities. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 216(5), 944-53; discussion 953-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2012.12.052
Satiani B, et al. A Review of Trends in Attrition Rates for Surgical Faculty: a Case for a Sustainable Retention Strategy to Cope With Demographic and Economic Realities. J Am Coll Surg. 2013;216(5):944-53; discussion 953-4. PubMed PMID: 23522787.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A review of trends in attrition rates for surgical faculty: a case for a sustainable retention strategy to cope with demographic and economic realities. AU - Satiani,Bhagwan, AU - Williams,Thomas E, AU - Brod,Heather, AU - Way,David P, AU - Ellison,E Christopher, Y1 - 2013/03/21/ PY - 2012/10/30/received PY - 2012/12/15/revised PY - 2012/12/20/accepted PY - 2013/3/26/entrez PY - 2013/3/26/pubmed PY - 2013/6/19/medline SP - 944-53; discussion 953-4 JF - Journal of the American College of Surgeons JO - J. Am. Coll. Surg. VL - 216 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Our aim was to compare trends in retention of academic surgeons by reviewing surgical faculty attrition rates (leaving academic surgery for any reason) of 3 cohorts at 5-year intervals between 1996 and 2011. STUDY DESIGN: The Association of American Medical Colleges' Faculty Administrative Management On-Line User System database was queried for a retention report of all tenure/clinical track full-time MD faculty within our academic medical center on July 1, 1996 (group 1), July 1, 2001 (group 2), and July 1, 2006 (group 3). Retention was tracked for 5 years post snapshot. The individual 5-year cohort attrition rates (observed frequencies) were compared with combined attrition rates for all 3 groups (expected frequencies). RESULTS: Overall, attrition trends for groups 2 (lower) and 3 (higher) were significantly different than the trends for all groups combined. Minorities and professors at the full or associate rank in group 3 contributed to this difference. Faculty in group 3 leaving our academic medical center were significantly more likely to transition into nonacademic practice compared with the other 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Greater attrition in the last 5-year cohort, despite the increase in faculty positions, is worrisome. A continuous retention life cycle is critical if academic medical centers hope to compete for talent. Retention planning should include on-boarding programs for enculturation, monitoring of professional satisfaction, formalized mentoring of younger surgeons, retaining academic couples and a part-time workforce, leadership and talent management, exit interviews, and competitive financial packages. SN - 1879-1190 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23522787/A_review_of_trends_in_attrition_rates_for_surgical_faculty:_a_case_for_a_sustainable_retention_strategy_to_cope_with_demographic_and_economic_realities_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1072-7515(13)00086-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -