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Coffee and caffeine intake and breast cancer risk: an updated dose-response meta-analysis of 37 published studies.
Gynecol Oncol. 2013 Jun; 129(3):620-9.GO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We conducted an updated meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from published studies regarding the association of coffee and caffeine intake with breast cancer risk.

METHODS

Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. The fixed or random effect model was used based on heterogeneity test. The dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and multivariate random-effect meta-regression.

RESULTS

37 published articles, involving 59,018 breast cancer cases and 966,263 participants, were included in the meta-analysis. No significant association was found between breast cancer risk and coffee (RR=0.97, P=0.09), decaffeinated coffee (RR=0.98, P=0.55) and caffeine (RR=0.99, P=0.73), respectively. And the association was still not significant when combining coffee and caffeine (coffee/caffeine) (RR=0.97, P=0.09). However, an inverse association of coffee/caffeine with breast cancer risk was found for postmenopausal women (RR=0.94, P=0.02), and a strong and significant association of coffee with breast cancer risk was found for BRCA1 mutation carriers (RR=0.69, P<0.01). A linear dose-response relationship was found for breast cancer risk with coffee and caffeine, and the risk of breast cancer decreased by 2% (P=0.05) for every 2 cups/day increment in coffee intake, and 1% (P=0.52) for every 200mg/day increment in caffeine intake, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Findings from this meta-analysis suggested that coffee/caffeine might be weakly associated with breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women, and the association for BRCA1 mutation carriers deserves further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, the Medical College of Qingdao University, Shandong, Qingdao, Dongzhou Road No. 38, PR China. jiangwjqd@yahoo.com.cnNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23535278

Citation

Jiang, Wenjie, et al. "Coffee and Caffeine Intake and Breast Cancer Risk: an Updated Dose-response Meta-analysis of 37 Published Studies." Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 129, no. 3, 2013, pp. 620-9.
Jiang W, Wu Y, Jiang X. Coffee and caffeine intake and breast cancer risk: an updated dose-response meta-analysis of 37 published studies. Gynecol Oncol. 2013;129(3):620-9.
Jiang, W., Wu, Y., & Jiang, X. (2013). Coffee and caffeine intake and breast cancer risk: an updated dose-response meta-analysis of 37 published studies. Gynecologic Oncology, 129(3), 620-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.03.014
Jiang W, Wu Y, Jiang X. Coffee and Caffeine Intake and Breast Cancer Risk: an Updated Dose-response Meta-analysis of 37 Published Studies. Gynecol Oncol. 2013;129(3):620-9. PubMed PMID: 23535278.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee and caffeine intake and breast cancer risk: an updated dose-response meta-analysis of 37 published studies. AU - Jiang,Wenjie, AU - Wu,Yili, AU - Jiang,Xiubo, Y1 - 2013/03/25/ PY - 2013/02/01/received PY - 2013/03/14/revised PY - 2013/03/17/accepted PY - 2013/3/29/entrez PY - 2013/3/29/pubmed PY - 2013/7/3/medline SP - 620 EP - 9 JF - Gynecologic oncology JO - Gynecol Oncol VL - 129 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We conducted an updated meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from published studies regarding the association of coffee and caffeine intake with breast cancer risk. METHODS: Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. The fixed or random effect model was used based on heterogeneity test. The dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and multivariate random-effect meta-regression. RESULTS: 37 published articles, involving 59,018 breast cancer cases and 966,263 participants, were included in the meta-analysis. No significant association was found between breast cancer risk and coffee (RR=0.97, P=0.09), decaffeinated coffee (RR=0.98, P=0.55) and caffeine (RR=0.99, P=0.73), respectively. And the association was still not significant when combining coffee and caffeine (coffee/caffeine) (RR=0.97, P=0.09). However, an inverse association of coffee/caffeine with breast cancer risk was found for postmenopausal women (RR=0.94, P=0.02), and a strong and significant association of coffee with breast cancer risk was found for BRCA1 mutation carriers (RR=0.69, P<0.01). A linear dose-response relationship was found for breast cancer risk with coffee and caffeine, and the risk of breast cancer decreased by 2% (P=0.05) for every 2 cups/day increment in coffee intake, and 1% (P=0.52) for every 200mg/day increment in caffeine intake, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this meta-analysis suggested that coffee/caffeine might be weakly associated with breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women, and the association for BRCA1 mutation carriers deserves further investigation. SN - 1095-6859 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23535278/Coffee_and_caffeine_intake_and_breast_cancer_risk:_an_updated_dose_response_meta_analysis_of_37_published_studies_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0090-8258(13)00169-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -