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Attentional modulation of emotional conflict processing with flanker tasks.
PLoS One. 2013; 8(3):e60548.Plos

Abstract

Emotion processing has been shown to acquire priority by biasing allocation of attentional resources. Aversive images or fearful expressions are processed quickly and automatically. Many existing findings suggested that processing of emotional information was pre-attentive, largely immune from attentional control. Other studies argued that attention gated the processing of emotion. To tackle this controversy, the current study examined whether and to what degrees attention modulated processing of emotion using a stimulus-response-compatibility (SRC) paradigm. We conducted two flanker experiments using color scale faces in neutral expressions or gray scale faces in emotional expressions. We found SRC effects for all three dimensions (color, gender, and emotion) and SRC effects were larger when the conflicts were task relevant than when they were task irrelevant, suggesting that conflict processing of emotion was modulated by attention, similar to those of color and face identity (gender). However, task modulation on color SRC effect was significantly greater than that on gender or emotion SRC effect, indicating that processing of salient information was modulated by attention to a lesser degree than processing of non-emotional stimuli. We proposed that emotion processing can be influenced by attentional control, but at the same time salience of emotional information may bias toward bottom-up processing, rendering less top-down modulation than that on non-emotional stimuli.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23544155

Citation

Zhou, Pingyan, and Xun Liu. "Attentional Modulation of Emotional Conflict Processing With Flanker Tasks." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 3, 2013, pp. e60548.
Zhou P, Liu X. Attentional modulation of emotional conflict processing with flanker tasks. PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e60548.
Zhou, P., & Liu, X. (2013). Attentional modulation of emotional conflict processing with flanker tasks. PloS One, 8(3), e60548. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0060548
Zhou P, Liu X. Attentional Modulation of Emotional Conflict Processing With Flanker Tasks. PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e60548. PubMed PMID: 23544155.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attentional modulation of emotional conflict processing with flanker tasks. AU - Zhou,Pingyan, AU - Liu,Xun, Y1 - 2013/03/27/ PY - 2012/11/01/received PY - 2013/02/27/accepted PY - 2013/4/2/entrez PY - 2013/4/2/pubmed PY - 2013/9/18/medline SP - e60548 EP - e60548 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - Emotion processing has been shown to acquire priority by biasing allocation of attentional resources. Aversive images or fearful expressions are processed quickly and automatically. Many existing findings suggested that processing of emotional information was pre-attentive, largely immune from attentional control. Other studies argued that attention gated the processing of emotion. To tackle this controversy, the current study examined whether and to what degrees attention modulated processing of emotion using a stimulus-response-compatibility (SRC) paradigm. We conducted two flanker experiments using color scale faces in neutral expressions or gray scale faces in emotional expressions. We found SRC effects for all three dimensions (color, gender, and emotion) and SRC effects were larger when the conflicts were task relevant than when they were task irrelevant, suggesting that conflict processing of emotion was modulated by attention, similar to those of color and face identity (gender). However, task modulation on color SRC effect was significantly greater than that on gender or emotion SRC effect, indicating that processing of salient information was modulated by attention to a lesser degree than processing of non-emotional stimuli. We proposed that emotion processing can be influenced by attentional control, but at the same time salience of emotional information may bias toward bottom-up processing, rendering less top-down modulation than that on non-emotional stimuli. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23544155/Attentional_modulation_of_emotional_conflict_processing_with_flanker_tasks_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0060548 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -