Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Increased recognition of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections in the United States during 2000-2010: epidemiologic features and comparison with E. coli O157 infections.
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2013 May; 10(5):453-60.FP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are an important cause of diarrhea and the major cause of postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome. Non-O157 STEC infections are being recognized with greater frequency because of changing laboratory practices.

METHODS

Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) site staff conducted active, population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed STEC infections. We assessed frequency and incidence of STEC infections by serogroup and examined and compared demographic factors, clinical characteristics, and frequency of international travel among patients.

RESULTS

During 2000-2010, FoodNet sites reported 2006 cases of non-O157 STEC infection and 5688 cases of O157 STEC infections. The number of reported non-O157 STEC infections increased from an incidence of 0.12 per 100,000 population in 2000 to 0.95 per 100,000 in 2010; while the rate of O157 STEC infections decreased from 2.17 to 0.95 per 100,000. Among non-O157 STEC, six serogroups were most commonly reported: O26 (26%), O103 (22%), O111 (19%), O121 (6%), O45 (5%), and O145 (4%). Non-O157 STEC infections were more common among Hispanics, and infections were less severe than those caused by O157 STEC, but this varied by serogroup. Fewer non-O157 STEC infections were associated with outbreaks (7% versus 20% for O157), while more were associated with international travel (14% versus 3% for O157).

CONCLUSIONS

Improved understanding of the epidemiologic features of non-O157 STEC infections can inform food safety and other prevention efforts. To detect both O157 and non-O157 STEC infections, clinical laboratories should routinely and simultaneously test all stool specimens submitted for diagnosis of acute community-acquired diarrhea for O157 STEC and for Shiga toxin and ensure that isolates are sent to a public health laboratory for serotyping and subtyping.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. lgould@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23560425

Citation

Gould, L Hannah, et al. "Increased Recognition of non-O157 Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia Coli Infections in the United States During 2000-2010: Epidemiologic Features and Comparison With E. Coli O157 Infections." Foodborne Pathogens and Disease, vol. 10, no. 5, 2013, pp. 453-60.
Gould LH, Mody RK, Ong KL, et al. Increased recognition of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections in the United States during 2000-2010: epidemiologic features and comparison with E. coli O157 infections. Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2013;10(5):453-60.
Gould, L. H., Mody, R. K., Ong, K. L., Clogher, P., Cronquist, A. B., Garman, K. N., Lathrop, S., Medus, C., Spina, N. L., Webb, T. H., White, P. L., Wymore, K., Gierke, R. E., Mahon, B. E., & Griffin, P. M. (2013). Increased recognition of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections in the United States during 2000-2010: epidemiologic features and comparison with E. coli O157 infections. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease, 10(5), 453-60. https://doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2012.1401
Gould LH, et al. Increased Recognition of non-O157 Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia Coli Infections in the United States During 2000-2010: Epidemiologic Features and Comparison With E. Coli O157 Infections. Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2013;10(5):453-60. PubMed PMID: 23560425.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased recognition of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections in the United States during 2000-2010: epidemiologic features and comparison with E. coli O157 infections. AU - Gould,L Hannah, AU - Mody,Rajal K, AU - Ong,Kanyin L, AU - Clogher,Paula, AU - Cronquist,Alicia B, AU - Garman,Katie N, AU - Lathrop,Sarah, AU - Medus,Carlota, AU - Spina,Nancy L, AU - Webb,Tameka H, AU - White,Patricia L, AU - Wymore,Katie, AU - Gierke,Ruth E, AU - Mahon,Barbara E, AU - Griffin,Patricia M, AU - ,, Y1 - 2013/04/06/ PY - 2013/4/9/entrez PY - 2013/4/9/pubmed PY - 2015/3/31/medline SP - 453 EP - 60 JF - Foodborne pathogens and disease JO - Foodborne Pathog Dis VL - 10 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are an important cause of diarrhea and the major cause of postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome. Non-O157 STEC infections are being recognized with greater frequency because of changing laboratory practices. METHODS: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) site staff conducted active, population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed STEC infections. We assessed frequency and incidence of STEC infections by serogroup and examined and compared demographic factors, clinical characteristics, and frequency of international travel among patients. RESULTS: During 2000-2010, FoodNet sites reported 2006 cases of non-O157 STEC infection and 5688 cases of O157 STEC infections. The number of reported non-O157 STEC infections increased from an incidence of 0.12 per 100,000 population in 2000 to 0.95 per 100,000 in 2010; while the rate of O157 STEC infections decreased from 2.17 to 0.95 per 100,000. Among non-O157 STEC, six serogroups were most commonly reported: O26 (26%), O103 (22%), O111 (19%), O121 (6%), O45 (5%), and O145 (4%). Non-O157 STEC infections were more common among Hispanics, and infections were less severe than those caused by O157 STEC, but this varied by serogroup. Fewer non-O157 STEC infections were associated with outbreaks (7% versus 20% for O157), while more were associated with international travel (14% versus 3% for O157). CONCLUSIONS: Improved understanding of the epidemiologic features of non-O157 STEC infections can inform food safety and other prevention efforts. To detect both O157 and non-O157 STEC infections, clinical laboratories should routinely and simultaneously test all stool specimens submitted for diagnosis of acute community-acquired diarrhea for O157 STEC and for Shiga toxin and ensure that isolates are sent to a public health laboratory for serotyping and subtyping. SN - 1556-7125 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23560425/Increased_recognition_of_non_O157_Shiga_toxin_producing_Escherichia_coli_infections_in_the_United_States_during_2000_2010:_epidemiologic_features_and_comparison_with_E__coli_O157_infections_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/fpd.2012.1401?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -