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Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in association with air pollution at levels below current air quality guidelines.
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Apr; 121(4):488-93.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several studies have estimated associations between air pollution and birth outcomes, but few have evaluated potential effects on pregnancy complications.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated whether low-level exposure to air pollution is associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia.

METHODS

High-quality registry information on 81,110 singleton pregnancy outcomes in southern Sweden during 1999-2005 was linked to individual-level exposure estimates with high spatial resolution. Modeled exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx), expressed as mean concentrations per trimester, and proximity to roads of different traffic densities were used as proxy indicators of exposure to combustion-related air pollution. The data were analyzed by logistic regression, with and without adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS

The prevalence of gestational diabetes increased with each NOx quartile, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.03) for the highest (> 22.7 µg/m3) compared with the lowest quartile (2.5-8.9 µg/m3) of exposure during the second trimester. The adjusted OR for acquiring preeclampsia after exposure during the third trimester was 1.51 (1.32, 1.73) in the highest quartile of NOx compared with the lowest. Both outcomes were associated with high traffic density, but ORs were significant for gestational diabetes only.

CONCLUSION

NOx exposure during pregnancy was associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in an area with air pollution levels below current air quality guidelines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Ebba.Malmqvist@med.lu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23563048

Citation

Malmqvist, Ebba, et al. "Gestational Diabetes and Preeclampsia in Association With Air Pollution at Levels Below Current Air Quality Guidelines." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 121, no. 4, 2013, pp. 488-93.
Malmqvist E, Jakobsson K, Tinnerberg H, et al. Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in association with air pollution at levels below current air quality guidelines. Environ Health Perspect. 2013;121(4):488-93.
Malmqvist, E., Jakobsson, K., Tinnerberg, H., Rignell-Hydbom, A., & Rylander, L. (2013). Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in association with air pollution at levels below current air quality guidelines. Environmental Health Perspectives, 121(4), 488-93. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1205736
Malmqvist E, et al. Gestational Diabetes and Preeclampsia in Association With Air Pollution at Levels Below Current Air Quality Guidelines. Environ Health Perspect. 2013;121(4):488-93. PubMed PMID: 23563048.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in association with air pollution at levels below current air quality guidelines. AU - Malmqvist,Ebba, AU - Jakobsson,Kristina, AU - Tinnerberg,Håkan, AU - Rignell-Hydbom,Anna, AU - Rylander,Lars, Y1 - 2013/01/16/ PY - 2012/07/09/received PY - 2013/01/15/accepted PY - 2013/4/9/entrez PY - 2013/4/9/pubmed PY - 2013/9/21/medline SP - 488 EP - 93 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ Health Perspect VL - 121 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several studies have estimated associations between air pollution and birth outcomes, but few have evaluated potential effects on pregnancy complications. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether low-level exposure to air pollution is associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. METHODS: High-quality registry information on 81,110 singleton pregnancy outcomes in southern Sweden during 1999-2005 was linked to individual-level exposure estimates with high spatial resolution. Modeled exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx), expressed as mean concentrations per trimester, and proximity to roads of different traffic densities were used as proxy indicators of exposure to combustion-related air pollution. The data were analyzed by logistic regression, with and without adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: The prevalence of gestational diabetes increased with each NOx quartile, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.03) for the highest (> 22.7 µg/m3) compared with the lowest quartile (2.5-8.9 µg/m3) of exposure during the second trimester. The adjusted OR for acquiring preeclampsia after exposure during the third trimester was 1.51 (1.32, 1.73) in the highest quartile of NOx compared with the lowest. Both outcomes were associated with high traffic density, but ORs were significant for gestational diabetes only. CONCLUSION: NOx exposure during pregnancy was associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in an area with air pollution levels below current air quality guidelines. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23563048/Gestational_diabetes_and_preeclampsia_in_association_with_air_pollution_at_levels_below_current_air_quality_guidelines_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/ehp.1205736?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -